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Open AccessArticle

Social Return on Investment Analysis of the Health Precinct Community Hub for Chronic Conditions

1
Centre for Health Economics and Medicines Evaluation, Bangor University, Bangor LL57 2PZ, UK
2
North Wales Organisation for Randomised Trials in Health, Bangor University, Bangor LL57 2PZ, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(14), 5249; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17145249
Received: 12 May 2020 / Revised: 10 July 2020 / Accepted: 16 July 2020 / Published: 21 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exercise Referral and Social Prescribing for Physical Activity)
Local governments and Health Boards are seeking to develop integrated services to promote well-being. Social participation and physical activity are key in promoting well-being for older people. The Health Precinct is a community hub in North Wales that people with chronic conditions are referred to through social prescribing. To improve community-based assets there is a need to understand and evidence the social value they generate. Data collection took place October 2017–September 2019. Social Return on Investment (SROI) analysis was used to evaluate the Health Precinct. Stakeholders included participants aged 55+, participants’ families, staff, the National Health Service and local government. Participants’ health and well-being data were collected upon referral and four months later using the EQ-5D-5L, Campaign to End Loneliness Scale and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. Family members completed questionnaires at four months. Baseline data were collected for 159 participants. Follow-up data were available for 66 participants and 38 family members. The value of inputs was £55,389 (attendance fees, staffing, equipment, overheads), and the value of resulting benefits was £281,010; leading to a base case SROI ratio of £5.07 of social value generated for every £1 invested. Sensitivity analysis yielded estimates of between 2.60:1 and 5.16:1. View Full-Text
Keywords: Social Return on Investment (SROI); social prescribing; physical activity Social Return on Investment (SROI); social prescribing; physical activity
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Jones, C.; Hartfiel, N.; Brocklehurst, P.; Lynch, M.; Edwards, R.T. Social Return on Investment Analysis of the Health Precinct Community Hub for Chronic Conditions. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 5249.

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