Next Article in Journal
A Practical Approach to Using Integrated Knowledge Translation to Inform a Community-Based Exercise Study
Previous Article in Journal
Counteracting Physical Inactivity during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Evidence-Based Recommendations for Home-Based Exercise
Open AccessArticle

Evaluating Residential Segregation’s Relation to the Clustering of Poor Health across American Cities

1
Department of Sociology, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182, USA
2
Department of Sociology, University at Albany, SUNY, Albany, NY 12222, USA
3
Department of Sociology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70802, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(11), 3910; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17113910
Received: 16 March 2020 / Revised: 29 May 2020 / Accepted: 29 May 2020 / Published: 1 June 2020
Residential segregation by race/ethnicity is widely recognized as a leading source of health disparities. Not clear from past research, however, is the overall health burden cities face due to clustering brought about by segregation. This study builds on previous research by directly measuring how spatially unequal health outcomes are within segregated cities. Utilizing Census-tract data from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s 500 Cities project, we examine how different dimensions of spatial segregation are associated with the clustering of poor self-rated health in cities. We make novel usage of the Global Moran’s I statistic to measure the spatial clustering of poor health within cities. We find spatial segregation is associated with poor health clustering, however the race/ethnicity and dimension of segregation matter. Our study contributes to existing research on segregation and health by unpacking the localized associations of residential segregation with poor health clustering in U.S. cities. View Full-Text
Keywords: residential segregation; self-rated health; Moran’s I; poor health clustering residential segregation; self-rated health; Moran’s I; poor health clustering
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Gibbons, J.; Yang, T.-C.; Brault, E.; Barton, M. Evaluating Residential Segregation’s Relation to the Clustering of Poor Health across American Cities. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 3910.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop