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The Relationships between Maternal Feeding Practices and Food Neophobia and Picky Eating

Clinical Nutrition Department, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80215, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(11), 3894; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17113894
Received: 14 April 2020 / Revised: 12 May 2020 / Accepted: 29 May 2020 / Published: 31 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Parenting, Feeding and Child Eating Behaviors: A Complex Interplay)
Food neophobia and picky eating (FNPE) are dietary behaviors that have been frequently reported to coexist in children. Parental concerns about these dietary behaviors may influence the feeding practices employed. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated the bidirectional associations of maternal feeding practices with children’s FNPE behaviors. Using a convenience sampling technique, mothers of 195 healthy children aged 1–7 years were invited to complete a sociodemographic questionnaire, rate their child’s FNPE, and rate the extent to which each feeding practice was employed with the child. Maternal reports indicated that 37.4% (n = 73) of the children exhibited severe FNPE. Multiple linear regression analyses showed positive two-way associations between the “pressure to eat” feeding strategy and FNPE, and negative two-way associations between a healthy home food environment and FNPE. However, maternal practices of teaching and monitoring were not found to be associated with FNPE. Given the bidirectional relationships observed between FNPE and maternal feeding practices, primary health care providers should address the feeding practices used with a child and indicate that coercive feeding practices are counterproductive. Intervention studies targeting mothers of children with FNPE are needed to investigate whether specific maternal practices are more effective than others. View Full-Text
Keywords: food neophobia; picky eating; children; feeding practices; eating behaviors; Saudi Arabia food neophobia; picky eating; children; feeding practices; eating behaviors; Saudi Arabia
MDPI and ACS Style

Kutbi, H.A. The Relationships between Maternal Feeding Practices and Food Neophobia and Picky Eating. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 3894. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17113894

AMA Style

Kutbi HA. The Relationships between Maternal Feeding Practices and Food Neophobia and Picky Eating. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(11):3894. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17113894

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kutbi, Hebah A. 2020. "The Relationships between Maternal Feeding Practices and Food Neophobia and Picky Eating" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 11: 3894. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17113894

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