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Open AccessArticle

Global Heat Wave Hazard Considering Humidity Effects during the 21st Century

by Xi Chen 1,2, Ning Li 1,2,*, Jiawei Liu 3, Zhengtao Zhang 4 and Yuan Liu 1,2
1
Key Laboratory of Environmental Change and Natural Disaster of Ministry of Education, Faculty of Geographical Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China
2
Academy of Disaster Reduction and Emergency Management, Ministry of Emergency Management & Ministry of Education, Faculty of Geographical Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China
3
Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters (CIC-FEMD)/ Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster, Ministry of Education (KLME)/Joint International Research Laboratory of Climate and Environmental Change (ILCEC), Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China
4
Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing 100101, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(9), 1513; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16091513
Received: 25 March 2019 / Revised: 26 April 2019 / Accepted: 28 April 2019 / Published: 29 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Changes in Heatwaves – Past, Present and Future)
Humidity is a significant factor contributing to heat stress, but without enough consideration in studies of quantifying heat hazard or heat risk assessment. Here, the simplified wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT) considering joint effects of temperature and humidity was utilized as a heat index and the number of annual total heat wave days (HWDs) was employed to quantify heat hazard. In order to evaluate the humidity effects on heat waves, we quantified the difference in the number of HWDs over global land based on air temperature and WBGT. Spatial and temporal changes in surface air temperature, relative humidity, WBGT, and the difference in HWDs were analyzed using multi-model simulations for the reference period (1986–2005) and different greenhouse gas emission scenarios. Our analysis suggests that annual mean WBGT has been increasing since 1986, which is consistent with the rising trend in surface air temperature despite a slight decrease in relative humidity. Additionally, changes in annual mean WBGT are smaller and more spatially uniform than those in annual mean air temperature as a cancelation effect between temperature and water vapor. Results show that there is an underestimation of around 40–140 days in the number of HWDs per year in most regions within 15° latitude of the equator (the humid and warm tropics) during 2076–2095 without considering humidity effects. However, the estimation of HWDs has limited distinction between using WBGT and temperature alone in arid or cold regions. View Full-Text
Keywords: heat waves; humidity; future scenarios; global heat waves; humidity; future scenarios; global
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Chen, X.; Li, N.; Liu, J.; Zhang, Z.; Liu, Y. Global Heat Wave Hazard Considering Humidity Effects during the 21st Century. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 1513.

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