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The Association between Indoor Air Quality and Adult Blood Pressure Levels in a High-Income Setting
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Maternal Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution and Birth Outcomes

1
School of Population and Global Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine Sciences, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia
2
School of Paediatrics and Child Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine Sciences, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia
3
Telethon Kids Institute, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia
4
School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Curtin University, Bentley, WA 6102, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(8), 1364; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16081364
Received: 11 March 2019 / Accepted: 14 April 2019 / Published: 16 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Indoor Air Pollution and Health)
There is a growing body of research on the association between ambient air pollution and adverse birth outcomes. However, people in high income countries spend most of their time indoors. Pregnant women spend much of that time at home. The aim of this study was to investigate if indoor air pollutants were associated with poor birth outcomes. Pregnant women were recruited prior to 18 weeks gestation. They completed a housing questionnaire and household chemical use survey. Indoor pollutants, formaldehyde (HCHO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), were monitored in the women’s homes at 34 weeks gestation. Gestational age (GA), birth weight (BW) and length (BL) and head circumference (HC) were collected from birth records. The associations between measured pollutants, and pollution surrogates, were analysed using general linear models, controlling for maternal age, parity, maternal health, and season of birth. Only HCHO was associated with any of the birth outcomes. There was a 0.044 decrease in BW z-score (p = 0.033) and 0.05 decrease in HC z-score (p = 0.06) for each unit increase in HCHO. Although HCHO concentrations were very low, this finding is consistent with other studies of formaldehyde and poor birth outcomes. View Full-Text
Keywords: indoor air pollution; formaldehyde; pregnancy; birth outcomes indoor air pollution; formaldehyde; pregnancy; birth outcomes
MDPI and ACS Style

Franklin, P.; Tan, M.; Hemy, N.; Hall, G.L. Maternal Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution and Birth Outcomes. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 1364.

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