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Article

Work-Life Conflict among U.S. Long-Haul Truck Drivers: Influences of Work Organization, Perceived Job Stress, Sleep, and Organizational Support

1
Public Health Program, Department of Health & Exercise Science, Appalachian State University, Leon Levine Hall, 1179 State Farm Road, P.O. Box 32071, Boone, NC 28607, USA
2
Department of Social Sciences, University of Houston-Downtown, One Main Street, Houston, TX 77002, USA
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Complexity & Computational Population Health Group, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA
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Department of Health & Kinesiology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA
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Department of Management, Appalachian State University, 416 Howard Street, P.O. Box 32089, Boone, NC 28608, USA
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College of Business Administration, University of Central Florida, 12744 Pegasus Drive, Orlando, FL 32816, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(6), 984; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16060984
Received: 18 February 2019 / Revised: 5 March 2019 / Accepted: 13 March 2019 / Published: 19 March 2019
Work-life balance and job stress are critical to health and well-being. Long-haul truck driving (LHTD) is among the unhealthiest and most unsafe occupations in the U.S. Despite these disparities, there are no extant published studies examining the influence of work, stress and sleep outcomes on drivers’ work-life balance. The current study investigated whether adverse work organization, stress, and poor sleep health among LHTDs are significantly associated with work-life conflict. Logistic regression was used to examine how work organization characteristics, job stress, and sleep influenced perceived stress and a composite measure of work-life conflict among a sample of 260 U.S. LHTDs. The pattern of regression results dictated subsequent analyses using structural equation modeling (SEM). Perceived job stress was the only statistically significant predictor for work-life balance. Fast pace of work, sleep duration and sleep quality were predictors of perceived job stress. SEM further elucidated that stress mediates the influences of fast work pace, supervisor/coworker support, and low sleep duration on each of the individual work-life balance indicators. There is an urgent need to address work conditions of LHTDs to better support their health, well-being, and work-life balance. Specifically, the findings from this study illustrate that scheduling practices and sleep outcomes could alleviate job stress and need to be addressed to more effectively support work-life balance. Future research and interventions should focus on policy and systems-level change. View Full-Text
Keywords: long-haul truck drivers; work-life balance; work organization; sleep; job stress; occupational health disparities long-haul truck drivers; work-life balance; work organization; sleep; job stress; occupational health disparities
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hege, A.; Lemke, M.K.; Apostolopoulos, Y.; Whitaker, B.; Sönmez, S. Work-Life Conflict among U.S. Long-Haul Truck Drivers: Influences of Work Organization, Perceived Job Stress, Sleep, and Organizational Support. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 984. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16060984

AMA Style

Hege A, Lemke MK, Apostolopoulos Y, Whitaker B, Sönmez S. Work-Life Conflict among U.S. Long-Haul Truck Drivers: Influences of Work Organization, Perceived Job Stress, Sleep, and Organizational Support. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(6):984. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16060984

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hege, Adam, Michael K. Lemke, Yorghos Apostolopoulos, Brian Whitaker, and Sevil Sönmez. 2019. "Work-Life Conflict among U.S. Long-Haul Truck Drivers: Influences of Work Organization, Perceived Job Stress, Sleep, and Organizational Support" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 6: 984. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16060984

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