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Traditional Diet and Environmental Contaminants in Coastal Chukotka III: Metals
Open AccessArticle

Traditional Diet and Environmental Contaminants in Coastal Chukotka I: Study Design and Dietary Patterns

1
Department of Arctic Environmental Health, Northwest Public Health Research Center, St-Petersburg 191036, Russia
2
Institute of Northern Engineering and Department of Anthropology, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775, USA
3
Institute of Northern Engineering and Department of Art, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(5), 702; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16050702
Received: 17 November 2018 / Revised: 17 December 2018 / Accepted: 18 December 2018 / Published: 27 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Health in the Arctic)
The article is the first in the series of four that present the results of a study on environmental contaminants in coastal Chukotka, conducted in the context of a multi-disciplinary investigation of indigenous foodways in the region of the Bering Strait. We provide an overview of the contemporary foodways in our study region and present the results of the survey on the consumption of locally harvested foods, carried out in 2016 in the Chukotkan communities of Enmelen, Nunligran, and Sireniki. The present results are evaluated in comparison to those of the analyses carried out in 2001–2002 in the village of Uelen, located further north. Where appropriate, we also draw comparative insight from the Alaskan side of the Bering Strait. The article sets the stage for the analyses of legacy persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and metals to which the residents become exposed through diet and other practices embedded in the local foodways, and for the discussion of the Recommended Food Daily Intake Limits (RFDILs) of the food that has been sampled and analyzed in the current study. View Full-Text
Keywords: subsistence food; traditional diet; indigenous people; cuisine; aesthetics; coastal Chukotka; Bering Strait; Russian Arctic subsistence food; traditional diet; indigenous people; cuisine; aesthetics; coastal Chukotka; Bering Strait; Russian Arctic
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Dudarev, A.A.; Yamin-Pasternak, S.; Pasternak, I.; Chupakhin, V.S. Traditional Diet and Environmental Contaminants in Coastal Chukotka I: Study Design and Dietary Patterns. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 702.

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