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Does Eating-Away-from-Home Increase the Risk of a Metabolic Syndrome Diagnosis?

1,†, 2,† and 3,*
1
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210011, China
2
Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, Beijing Research Center for Preventive Medicine, Beijing 100034, China
3
College of Economics and Management, China Center for Food Security Studies, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(4), 575; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16040575
Received: 27 November 2018 / Revised: 17 January 2019 / Accepted: 13 February 2019 / Published: 16 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Collection Health Behaviors, Risk Factors, NCDs and Health Promotion)
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Abstract

Rising frequency of eating-away-from-home (EAFH) is suspected to be correlated with several non-communicable diseases. This study adopted the Chinese Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS) 2009 data to investigate the association between being diagnosed with the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and EAFH at different ages. Results showed that the association between EAFH and MetS varied at different ages and differed for males and females. EAFH was positively associated with a higher risk of getting MetS for males, especially for those aged between 45 and 60; while it was negatively associated with the risk of getting MetS for young females (<45) (all p < 0.05). In particular, EAFH was associated with a lower risk of getting high serum triglycerides (TGs), abdominal adiposity, elevated blood pressure, and impaired fasting blood glucose for young females, while higher risk of high serum TGs, abdominal adiposity, elevated blood pressure, and impaired fasting blood glucose for middle-aged males (all p < 0.05). In addition, a higher frequency of EAFH was associated with a higher risk of abdominal adiposity and elevated blood pressure for older women, and a lower risk of elevated blood pressure, and impaired fasting blood glucose for younger men (all p < 0.05). Our study implies that heterogeneous target strategies for preventing MetS in different subpopulation should be considered. View Full-Text
Keywords: eating-away-from-home; metabolic syndrome; metabolic syndrome components; sex eating-away-from-home; metabolic syndrome; metabolic syndrome components; sex
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Wang, H.; Yu, Y.; Tian, X. Does Eating-Away-from-Home Increase the Risk of a Metabolic Syndrome Diagnosis? Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 575.

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