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Adapting Digital Social Prescribing for Suicide Bereavement Support: The Findings of a Consultation Exercise to Explore the Acceptability of Implementing Digital Social Prescribing within an Existing Postvention Service
Open AccessArticle

Understanding the Experience and Needs of School Counsellors When Working with Young People Who Engage in Self-Harm

1
Department of Psychological Medicine, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
2
Department of Psychology, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
3
Orygen The National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, 35 Poplar Rd, Melbourne, Victoria 3052, Australia
4
Centre for Youth Mental Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne 3010, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Joint senior authors.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(23), 4844; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16234844
Received: 18 October 2019 / Revised: 9 November 2019 / Accepted: 15 November 2019 / Published: 2 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Suicide: Prevention, Intervention and Postvention)
Self-harm rates are increasing globally and demand for supporting, treating and managing young people who engage in self-harm often falls to schools. Yet the approach taken by schools varies. This study aimed to explore the experience of school staff managing self-harm, and to obtain their views on the use of guidelines in their work. Twenty-six pastoral care staff from New Zealand were interviewed. Interviews were analyzed and coded using thematic analysis. Three themes emerged: The burden of the role; discrepancies in expectations, training, and experience; and the need for guidelines to support their work. This research, therefore, demonstrated a need for guidelines to support school staff to provide support around decision making and response to self-harm in the school environment. View Full-Text
Keywords: self-harm; suicide; school; guidelines self-harm; suicide; school; guidelines
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Te Maro, B.; Cuthbert, S.; Sofo, M.; Tasker, K.; Bowden, L.; Donkin, L.; Hetrick, S.E. Understanding the Experience and Needs of School Counsellors When Working with Young People Who Engage in Self-Harm. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 4844.

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