Next Article in Journal
Children’s Dental Sealant Use and Caries Prevalence Affected by National Health Insurance Policy Change: Evidence from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2007–2015)
Previous Article in Journal
Removal of Chromium from a Contaminated Soil Using Oxalic Acid, Citric Acid, and Hydrochloric Acid: Dynamics, Mechanisms, and Concomitant Removal of Non-Targeted Metals
Article Menu
Issue 15 (August-1) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle

Pregnant Smokers’ Experiences and Opinions of Techniques Aimed to Address Barriers and Facilitators to Smoking Cessation: A Qualitative Study

1
Division of Primary Care, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK
2
Population Health Research Institute, St George’s University of London, London SW17 0RE, UK
3
Institute for Social Marketing, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(15), 2772; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16152772
Received: 16 July 2019 / Revised: 30 July 2019 / Accepted: 1 August 2019 / Published: 2 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smoking Cessation in Pregnancy and Postpartum)
  |  
PDF [1532 KB, uploaded 2 August 2019]
  |  

Abstract

Pregnant women experience certain barriers and facilitators (B&Fs) when trying to quit smoking. This study aimed to elicit women’s views on techniques that could help overcome or enhance these. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 pregnant women who had experience of smoking during pregnancy. Participants were prompted to discuss experiences of B&Fs and give suggestions of techniques that could address these appropriately. A thematic analysis was conducted using the one sheet of paper method. Four themes relating to suggested techniques were identified: accessing professional help, nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), distraction, and social interactions. Experiences of accessing professional help were generally positive, especially if there was a good rapport with, and easy access to a practitioner. Most women were aware of NRT, those who had used it reported both negative and positive experiences. Praise and encouragement from others towards cessation attempts appeared motivating; peer support groups were deemed useful. Women reported experiencing B&Fs which fell under four themes: influence of others, internal motivation, cues to smoke, and health. Overall, accessing professional support generated positive changes in smoking habits. Establishing ways of how to encourage more women to seek help and raising awareness of different types of support available would seem beneficial. View Full-Text
Keywords: smoking in pregnancy; smoking cessation; behavior change techniques; qualitative research; interviews smoking in pregnancy; smoking cessation; behavior change techniques; qualitative research; interviews
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Fergie, L.; Coleman, T.; Ussher, M.; Cooper, S.; Campbell, K.A. Pregnant Smokers’ Experiences and Opinions of Techniques Aimed to Address Barriers and Facilitators to Smoking Cessation: A Qualitative Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 2772.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top