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Article

Association of Infant Eczema with Childhood and Adult Asthma: Analysis of Data from the 1958 Birth Cohort Study

1
European Centre for Environment and Human Health, University of Exeter Medical School, Knowledge Spa, Royal Cornwall Hospital, Truro, Cornwall TR1 3HD, UK
2
Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Ain Shams University, Khalifa El-Maamon St, Abbasiya Sq., Cairo 11566, Egypt
3
Public Health, Cornwall Council, New County Hall, Truro, Cornwall, TR1 3AY, UK
4
School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Kensington, Sydney 2052, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(7), 1415; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15071415
Received: 26 May 2018 / Revised: 2 July 2018 / Accepted: 4 July 2018 / Published: 5 July 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Epidemiology of Allergy)
The influence of early life exposures on later life disease has for some time provided clues to modifiable risk factors of disease. The “atopic march” is thought to play a role in the progression of allergic diseases and may offer an opportunity to lower asthma’s health and socioeconomic burden, although evidence remains controversial. We aimed to examine the relationship between early life eczema and asthma later in life. Using the National Child Development Study, we examined infant eczema and childhood and adult asthma. Data related to asthma or wheezing bronchitis were available for 13,503 (73%; 95% CI 72–74), 11,503 (61%; 95% CI 60–61), 12,524 (68%; 95% CI 67–69), 11,194 (60%; 95% CI 60–60), 9377 (51%; 95% CI 51–51), and 9760 (53%; 95% CI 52–53) subjects at ages 11, 16, 23, 33, 44, and 50 years, respectively. Logistic regression models were fitted to examine each wave separately before and after adjusting for a range of potential confounders. Generalised estimating equation (GEE) methods were undertaken to examine the associations after pooling all data from questionnaires. The prevalence of self-reported asthma in those that had previously reported infant eczema ranged from 1.0%; 95% CI 0.9–1.4 (age 44 years) to 2.2%; 95% CI 2.1–2.3 (age 33 years). Participants with infant eczema had a 2–3-fold increased risk of reporting asthma in childhood and adulthood; this was 1.6 times at age 44 years when using spirometry measures. Similar effect sizes were observed in the GEE models when considering all participants (OR 2.9; 95% CI 2.6–3.2). Childhood and adult asthma were consistently associated with infant eczema both by using the self-reported data and lung measures. View Full-Text
Keywords: asthma; eczema; atopic march; longitudinal cohort study asthma; eczema; atopic march; longitudinal cohort study
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MDPI and ACS Style

Abo-Zaid, G.; Sharpe, R.A.; Fleming, L.E.; Depledge, M.; Osborne, N.J. Association of Infant Eczema with Childhood and Adult Asthma: Analysis of Data from the 1958 Birth Cohort Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 1415. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15071415

AMA Style

Abo-Zaid G, Sharpe RA, Fleming LE, Depledge M, Osborne NJ. Association of Infant Eczema with Childhood and Adult Asthma: Analysis of Data from the 1958 Birth Cohort Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2018; 15(7):1415. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15071415

Chicago/Turabian Style

Abo-Zaid, Ghada, Richard A. Sharpe, Lora E. Fleming, Michael Depledge, and Nicholas J. Osborne 2018. "Association of Infant Eczema with Childhood and Adult Asthma: Analysis of Data from the 1958 Birth Cohort Study" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 15, no. 7: 1415. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15071415

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