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Open AccessArticle

Unfavorable Mortality-To-Incidence Ratio of Lung Cancer Is Associated with Health Care Disparity

1
Department of Urology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei 10002, Taiwan
2
Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 40201, Taiwan
3
Department of Urology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 40201, Taiwan
4
School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 40201, Taiwan
5
Institute of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 40201, Taiwan
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Department of Surgery, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 40201, Taiwan
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Department of Medical Education, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 40201, Taiwan
8
Department of Internal Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 40201, Taiwan
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Cheng-Yu Huang and Kwong-Kwok Au contribute equally in this manuscript.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(12), 2889; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15122889
Received: 20 November 2018 / Revised: 13 December 2018 / Accepted: 14 December 2018 / Published: 17 December 2018
The mortality-to-incidence ratio (MIR) is associated with the clinical outcome of cancer treatment. For several cancers, countries with relatively good health care systems have favorable MIRs. However, the association between lung cancer MIR and health care expenditures or rankings has not been evaluated. We used linear regression to analyze the correlation between lung cancer MIRs and the total expenditures on health/gross domestic product (e/GDP) and the World Health Organization (WHO) rankings. We included 57 countries, for which data of adequate quality were available, and we found high rates of incidence and mortality but low MIRs in more developed regions. Among the continents, North America had the highest rates of incidence and mortality, whereas the highest MIRs were in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Globally, favorable MIRs correlated with high e/GDP and good WHO ranking (regression coefficient, −0.014 and 0.001; p = 0.004, and p = 0.014, respectively). In conclusion, the MIR for lung cancer in different countries varies with the expenditure on health care and health system rankings. View Full-Text
Keywords: lung cancer; mortality; incidence; mortality-to-incidence ratio lung cancer; mortality; incidence; mortality-to-incidence ratio
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Huang, C.-Y.; Au, K.-K.; Chen, S.-L.; Wang, S.-C.; Liao, C.-Y.; Hsu, H.-H.; Sung, W.-W.; Wang, Y.-C. Unfavorable Mortality-To-Incidence Ratio of Lung Cancer Is Associated with Health Care Disparity. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 2889.

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