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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(1), 91; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15010091

Climate Change Risk Perception in Taiwan: Correlation with Individual and Societal Factors

1
Institute for Disaster Management and Reconstruction, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610200, China
2
Center for Crisis Management Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 11 November 2017 / Revised: 30 December 2017 / Accepted: 4 January 2018 / Published: 8 January 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change and Health: An Interdisciplinary Perspective)
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Abstract

This study differentiates the risk perception and influencing factors of climate change along the dimensions of global severity and personal threat. Using the 2013 Taiwan Social Change Survey (TSGS) data (N = 2001) as a representative sample of adults from Taiwan, we investigated the influencing factors of the risk perceptions of climate change in these two dimensions (global severity and personal threat). Logistic regression models were used to examine the correlations of individual factors (gender, age, education, climate-related disaster experience and risk awareness, marital status, employment status, household income, and perceived social status) and societal factors (religion, organizational embeddedness, and political affiliations) with the above two dimensions. The results demonstrate that climate-related disaster experience has no significant impact on either the perception of global severity or the perception of personal impact. However, climate-related risk awareness (regarding typhoons, in particular) is positively associated with both dimensions of the perceived risks of climate change. With higher education, individuals are more concerned about global severity than personal threat. Regarding societal factors, the supporters of political parties have higher risk perceptions of climate change than people who have no party affiliation. Religious believers have higher risk perceptions of personal threat than non-religious people. This paper ends with a discussion about the effectiveness of efforts to enhance risk perception of climate change with regard to global severity and personal threat. View Full-Text
Keywords: risk perception; climate change; typhoon; individual factor; societal factor risk perception; climate change; typhoon; individual factor; societal factor
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Sun, Y.; Han, Z. Climate Change Risk Perception in Taiwan: Correlation with Individual and Societal Factors. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 91.

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