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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(1), 137; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15010137

A Long-Term Follow-Up of the Efficacy of Nature-Based Therapy for Adults Suffering from Stress-Related Illnesses on Levels of Healthcare Consumption and Sick-Leave Absence: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, 1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark
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Received: 27 November 2017 / Revised: 4 January 2018 / Accepted: 8 January 2018 / Published: 15 January 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Work Stress and the Development of Chronic Diseases)
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Abstract

Stress-related illnesses are a growing health problem in the Western world; which also has economic significance for society. As a consequence; there is a growing demand for effective treatments. The study investigates the long-term efficacy of the Nacadia® nature-based therapy (NNBT) by comparing it to the efficacy of a validated cognitive behavioral therapy, called STreSS. The study is designed as a randomized controlled trial in which 84 participants are randomly allocated between the treatments. Long-term efficacy is investigated through data extracts from the national database of Statistics Denmark on the sick leave and the health-care consumption. The results show that both the NNBT and the STreSS lead to a significant decrease in number of contacts with a general practitioner in the period from twelve months prior to treatment to twelve months after treatment; and, a significant decrease in long-term sick leave from the month prior to treatment to twelve months after treatment. The positive long-term effects provide validation for the NNBT as an efficient treatment of stress-related illnesses. View Full-Text
Keywords: stress-related illnesses; nature-based interventions; RCT; register data; pre-post study; health care utilization; therapy garden; CBT stress-related illnesses; nature-based interventions; RCT; register data; pre-post study; health care utilization; therapy garden; CBT
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Corazon, S.S.; Nyed, P.K.; Sidenius, U.; Poulsen, D.V.; Stigsdotter, U.K. A Long-Term Follow-Up of the Efficacy of Nature-Based Therapy for Adults Suffering from Stress-Related Illnesses on Levels of Healthcare Consumption and Sick-Leave Absence: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 137.

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