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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(7), 808; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14070808

Coping with Fear of and Exposure to Terrorism among Expatriates

1
School of Business, Iona College, New Rochelle, NY 10801, USA
2
College of Education and Human Services, Seton Hall University, South Orange, NJ 07079, USA
3
College of Business Administration, Rider University, Lawrenceville, NJ 08648, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 2 June 2017 / Revised: 10 July 2017 / Accepted: 14 July 2017 / Published: 19 July 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stress and Health)
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Abstract

This paper examines existing research on the impact of terrorism on expatriate coping strategies. We consider pre-assignment fear of terrorism, in-country coping strategies, and anxiety and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) associated with repatriation. The extant research is small but growing. Our model for expatriate coping at the pre-departure, in-country, and repatriation stages includes strategies specific to each stage. Preparation using proactive coping, systematic desensitization, problem and emotion focused coping, social support, and virtual reality explorations are recommended. Selecting expatriate candidates who are well-adjusted, emotionally intelligent, and possessing good coping skills is essential for successful assignments in terror-prone regions. View Full-Text
Keywords: expatriates; international assignees; stress; fear; terrorism; hostile environments coping; repatriates; duty of care; virtual reality; post-traumatic stress disorder expatriates; international assignees; stress; fear; terrorism; hostile environments coping; repatriates; duty of care; virtual reality; post-traumatic stress disorder
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Beutell, N.J.; O’Hare, M.M.; Schneer, J.A.; Alstete, J.W. Coping with Fear of and Exposure to Terrorism among Expatriates. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 808.

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