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Open AccessArticle

Maternal and Neonatal Levels of Perfluoroalkyl Substances in Relation to Gestational Weight Gain

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Perinatal Epidemiology Research Unit, IWK Health Centre, Halifax, NS B3K 6R8, Canada
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Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS B3K 6R8, Canada
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Health Canada, Ottawa, ON K1A 0K9, Canada
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Sainte Justine Hospital Research Center, University of Montreal, Montreal, PQ H3T 1C5, Canada
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Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Montreal, Montreal, PQ H3T 1A8, Canada
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Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, PQ H3A 1A2, Canada
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Departmentof Nutritional Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
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Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McGill University, Montreal, PQ H3A 1A1, Canada
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Faculty of Medicine, Laval University, Quebec City, PQ G1V 0A6, Canada
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Departments of Pediatrics and Child Health, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3E 3P4, Canada
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Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, PQ J1H 5N4, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Anthony R. Mawsn
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(1), 146; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph13010146
Received: 9 November 2015 / Revised: 7 January 2016 / Accepted: 15 January 2016 / Published: 20 January 2016
Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are ubiquitous, persistent pollutants widely used in the production of common household and consumer goods. There is a limited body of literature suggesting that these chemicals may alter metabolic pathways and growth trajectories. The relationship between prenatal exposures to these chemicals and gestational weight gain (GWG) has received limited attention. One objective was to analyze the associations among maternal plasma levels of three common perfluoroalkyl substances (perfluorooctanoate (PFOA), perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS), perfluorohexanesulfanoate (PFHxS)) and GWG. Additionally, we explored whether GWG was associated with cord blood PFAS levels. This study utilized data collected in the Maternal-Infant Research on Environmental Chemicals (MIREC) Study, a trans-Canada cohort study of 2001 pregnant women. Our analysis quantified associations between (1) maternal PFAS concentrations and GWG and (2) GWG and cord blood PFAS concentrations. Maternal PFOS concentrations were positively associated with GWG (β = 0.39 95% CI: 0.02, 0.75). Interquartile increases in GWG were significantly associated with elevated cord blood PFOA (OR = 1.33; 95% CI: 1.13 to 1.56) and PFOS (OR = 1.20; 95% CI: 1.03 to 1.40) concentrations. No statistically significant associations were observed between GWG and either measure of PFHxS. These findings warrant elucidation of the potential underlying mechanisms. View Full-Text
Keywords: perfluoroalkyl substances; gestational weight gain; environmental contaminants; birth cohort perfluoroalkyl substances; gestational weight gain; environmental contaminants; birth cohort
MDPI and ACS Style

Ashley-Martin, J.; Dodds, L.; Arbuckle, T.E.; Morisset, A.-S.; Fisher, M.; Bouchard, M.F.; Shapiro, G.D.; Ettinger, A.S.; Monnier, P.; Dallaire, R.; Taback, S.; Fraser, W. Maternal and Neonatal Levels of Perfluoroalkyl Substances in Relation to Gestational Weight Gain. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 146.

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