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Open AccessReview

Biomedical and Clinical Importance of Mussel-Inspired Polymers and Materials

1
Plasma Bioscience Research Center, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139701, Korea
2
Department of Biotechnology, Delhi Technological University, Delhi 110042, India
3
Graduate School of Information Contents, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139701, Korea
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally in this work.
Academic Editor: Anake Kijjoa
Mar. Drugs 2015, 13(11), 6792-6817; https://doi.org/10.3390/md13116792
Received: 5 October 2015 / Revised: 2 November 2015 / Accepted: 3 November 2015 / Published: 11 November 2015
The substance secreted by mussels, also known as nature’s glue, is a type of liquid protein that hardens rapidly into a solid water-resistant adhesive material. While in seawater or saline conditions, mussels can adhere to all types of surfaces, sustaining its bonds via mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs), a group of proteins containing 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) and catecholic amino acid. Several aspects of this adhesion process have inspired the development of various types of synthetic materials for biomedical applications. Further, there is an urgent need to utilize biologically inspired strategies to develop new biocompatible materials for medical applications. Consequently, many researchers have recently reported bio-inspired techniques and materials that show results similar to or better than those shown by MAPs for a range of medical applications. However, the susceptibility to oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine poses major challenges with regard to the practical translation of mussel adhesion. In this review, various strategies are discussed to provide an option for DOPA/metal ion chelation and to compensate for the limitations imposed by facile 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine autoxidation. We discuss the anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial activity, and adhesive behaviors of mussel bio-products and mussel-inspired materials (MIMs) that make them attractive for synthetic adaptation. The development of biologically inspired adhesive interfaces, bioactive mussel products, MIMs, and arising areas of research leading to biomedical applications are considered in this review. View Full-Text
Keywords: mussels; mussel-inspired biomedical applications; medical adhesive; wound healing; anti-proliferative; anti-inflammatory; stem cell differentiation; surface coating; nano-constructs mussels; mussel-inspired biomedical applications; medical adhesive; wound healing; anti-proliferative; anti-inflammatory; stem cell differentiation; surface coating; nano-constructs
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Kaushik, N.K.; Kaushik, N.; Pardeshi, S.; Sharma, J.G.; Lee, S.H.; Choi, E.H. Biomedical and Clinical Importance of Mussel-Inspired Polymers and Materials. Mar. Drugs 2015, 13, 6792-6817.

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