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Article

Assessment of Dry Epidermal Electrodes for Long-Term Electromyography Measurements

1
Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
2
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
3
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
4
Chengdu Rotex Technology Company Ltd., Chengdu 610041, China
5
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sensors 2018, 18(4), 1269; https://doi.org/10.3390/s18041269
Received: 13 March 2018 / Revised: 19 April 2018 / Accepted: 19 April 2018 / Published: 20 April 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors for Health Monitoring and Disease Diagnosis)
Commercially available electrodes can only provide quality surface electromyography (sEMG) measurements for a limited duration due to user discomfort and signal degradation, but in many applications, collecting sEMG data for a full day or longer is desirable to enhance clinical care. Few studies for long-term sEMG have assessed signal quality of electrodes using clinically relevant tests. The goal of this research was to evaluate flexible, gold-based epidermal sensor system (ESS) electrodes for long-term sEMG recordings. We collected sEMG and impedance data from eight subjects from ESS and standard clinical electrodes on upper extremity muscles during maximum voluntary isometric contraction tests, dynamic range of motion tests, the Jebsen Taylor Hand Function Test, and the Box & Block Test. Four additional subjects were recruited to test the stability of ESS signals over four days. Signals from the ESS and traditional electrodes were strongly correlated across tasks. Measures of signal quality, such as signal-to-noise ratio and signal-to-motion ratio, were also similar for both electrodes. Over the four-day trial, no significant decrease in signal quality was observed in the ESS electrodes, suggesting that thin, flexible electrodes may provide a robust tool that does not inhibit movement or irritate the skin for long-term measurements of muscle activity in rehabilitation and other applications. View Full-Text
Keywords: neurological injury; stroke rehabilitation; impedance measurements; Jebsen Taylor Hand Function Test; Box & Block; signal-to-noise ratio neurological injury; stroke rehabilitation; impedance measurements; Jebsen Taylor Hand Function Test; Box & Block; signal-to-noise ratio
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MDPI and ACS Style

Yamagami, M.; Peters, K.M.; Milovanovic, I.; Kuang, I.; Yang, Z.; Lu, N.; Steele, K.M. Assessment of Dry Epidermal Electrodes for Long-Term Electromyography Measurements. Sensors 2018, 18, 1269. https://doi.org/10.3390/s18041269

AMA Style

Yamagami M, Peters KM, Milovanovic I, Kuang I, Yang Z, Lu N, Steele KM. Assessment of Dry Epidermal Electrodes for Long-Term Electromyography Measurements. Sensors. 2018; 18(4):1269. https://doi.org/10.3390/s18041269

Chicago/Turabian Style

Yamagami, Momona, Keshia M. Peters, Ivana Milovanovic, Irene Kuang, Zeyu Yang, Nanshu Lu, and Katherine M. Steele 2018. "Assessment of Dry Epidermal Electrodes for Long-Term Electromyography Measurements" Sensors 18, no. 4: 1269. https://doi.org/10.3390/s18041269

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