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Article

Mexican-Hat-Like Response in a Flexible Tactile Sensor Using a Magnetorheological Elastomer

1
Department of Adaptive Machine Systems, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita 5650871, Japan
2
Department of Mechanical Engineering and Intelligent Systems, Graduate School of Informatics and Engineering, The University of Electro-Communications, Chofu 1828585, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sensors 2018, 18(2), 587; https://doi.org/10.3390/s18020587
Received: 19 December 2017 / Revised: 5 February 2018 / Accepted: 12 February 2018 / Published: 14 February 2018
(This article belongs to the Section Physical Sensors)
A significant challenge in robotics is providing a sense of touch to robots. Even though several types of flexible tactile sensors have been proposed, they still have various technical issues such as a large amount of deformation that fractures the sensing elements, a poor maintainability and a deterioration in the sensitivity caused by the presence of a thick and soft covering. As one solution for these issues, we proposed a flexible tactile sensor composed of a magnet, magnetic transducer and dual-layer elastomer, which consists of a magnetorheological and nonmagnetic elastomer sheet. In this study, we first investigated the sensitivity of the sensor, which was found to be high (approximately 161 mV/N with a signal-to-noise ratio of 42.2 dB); however, the sensor has a speed-dependent hysteresis in its sensor response curve. Then, we investigated the spatial response and observed the following results: (1) the sensor response was a distorted Mexican-hat-like bipolar shape, namely a negative response area was observed around the positive response area; (2) the negative response area disappeared when we used a compressible sponge sheet instead of the incompressible nonmagnetic elastomer. We concluded that the characteristic negative response in the Mexican-hat-like response is derived from the incompressibility of the nonmagnetic elastomer. View Full-Text
Keywords: force and tactile sensing; tactile sensor; robotic skin; flexible materials; magnetorheological elastomer; magnetic flux measurements force and tactile sensing; tactile sensor; robotic skin; flexible materials; magnetorheological elastomer; magnetic flux measurements
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kawasetsu, T.; Horii, T.; Ishihara, H.; Asada, M. Mexican-Hat-Like Response in a Flexible Tactile Sensor Using a Magnetorheological Elastomer. Sensors 2018, 18, 587. https://doi.org/10.3390/s18020587

AMA Style

Kawasetsu T, Horii T, Ishihara H, Asada M. Mexican-Hat-Like Response in a Flexible Tactile Sensor Using a Magnetorheological Elastomer. Sensors. 2018; 18(2):587. https://doi.org/10.3390/s18020587

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kawasetsu, Takumi, Takato Horii, Hisashi Ishihara, and Minoru Asada. 2018. "Mexican-Hat-Like Response in a Flexible Tactile Sensor Using a Magnetorheological Elastomer" Sensors 18, no. 2: 587. https://doi.org/10.3390/s18020587

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