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Sensors and Sensory Processing for Airborne Vibrations in Silk Moths and Honeybees

Department of Earth System Science, Faculty of Science, Fukuoka University, 8-19-1 Nanakuma, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka 814-0180, Japan
Sensors 2013, 13(7), 9344-9363; https://doi.org/10.3390/s130709344
Received: 9 May 2013 / Revised: 2 July 2013 / Accepted: 13 July 2013 / Published: 19 July 2013
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Sensors Technology in Japan 2012)
Insects use airborne vibrations caused by their own movements to control their behaviors and produce airborne vibrations to communicate with conspecific mates. In this review, I use two examples to introduce how insects use airborne vibrations to accurately control behavior or for communication. The first example is vibration-sensitive sensilla along the wing margin that stabilize wingbeat frequency. There are two specialized sensors along the wing margin for detecting the airborne vibration caused by wingbeats. The response properties of these sensors suggest that each sensor plays a different role in the control of wingbeats. The second example is Johnston’s organ that contributes to regulating flying speed and perceiving vector information about food sources to hive-mates. There are parallel vibration processing pathways in the central nervous system related with these behaviors, flight and communication. Both examples indicate that the frequency of airborne vibration are filtered on the sensory level and that on the central nervous system level, the extracted vibration signals are integrated with other sensory signals for executing quick adaptive motor response. View Full-Text
Keywords: vibration; wingbeat; bristle; proprioceptors; Bombyx; Johnston’s organ; antenna; waggle dance; honeybee; brain vibration; wingbeat; bristle; proprioceptors; Bombyx; Johnston’s organ; antenna; waggle dance; honeybee; brain
MDPI and ACS Style

Ai, H. Sensors and Sensory Processing for Airborne Vibrations in Silk Moths and Honeybees. Sensors 2013, 13, 9344-9363.

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