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Open AccessCommunication

Implementing and Monitoring the Use of Artificial Canopy Bridges by Mammals and Birds in an Indonesian Agroforestry Environment

1
Nocturnal Primate Research Group, School of Social Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford OX3 0BP, UK
2
Little Fireface Project, Cipaganti, West Java 40131, Indonesia
3
Department of Forest Resources Conservation, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta 55281, Indonesia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Diversity 2020, 12(10), 399; https://doi.org/10.3390/d12100399
Received: 22 September 2020 / Revised: 7 October 2020 / Accepted: 13 October 2020 / Published: 15 October 2020
Deforestation is a major threat to biodiversity, particularly within tropical forest habitats. Some of the fastest diminishing tropical forest habitats in the world occur in Indonesia, where fragmentation is severely impacting biodiversity, including on the island of Java, which holds many endemic species. Extreme fragmentation on the western part of the island, especially due to small-scale agriculture, impacts animal movement and increases mortality risk for mainly arboreal taxa. To mitigate this risk in an agroforest environment in Garut District, West Java, we installed 10 canopy bridges and monitored them through camera trapping between 2017 and 2019. Five of the monitored bridges were made of waterlines and five of rubber hose. We recorded Javan palm civets using the waterline bridges 938 times, while Javan slow lorises used the waterlines 1079 times and the rubber bridges 358 times. At least 19 other species used the bridges for crossing or perching. Our results demonstrate that relatively simple and cost-effective materials can be used to mitigate the effects of habitat fragmentation. We also recommend the use of camera traps to monitor the effectiveness of these interventions.
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Keywords: camera trap; palm civet; slow loris; habitat degradation; conservation evidence; deforestation; fragmentation; biodiversity camera trap; palm civet; slow loris; habitat degradation; conservation evidence; deforestation; fragmentation; biodiversity
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MDPI and ACS Style

Nekaris, K.A.I.; Handby, V.; Campera, M.; Birot, H.; Hedger, K.; Eaton, J.; Imron, M.A. Implementing and Monitoring the Use of Artificial Canopy Bridges by Mammals and Birds in an Indonesian Agroforestry Environment. Diversity 2020, 12, 399.

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