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Article

Natural Killer Cells from Allergic Donors Are Defective in Their Response to CCL18 Chemokine

1
U1019–UMR 9017-CIIL-Center for Infection and Immunity of Lille, Institut Pasteur de Lille, University of Lille, CNRS, Inserm, CHU Lille, F-59000 Lille, France
2
CHU Lille, Service de Pneumologie et Immuno-Allergologie, Centre de Compétence pour les Maladies Pulmonaires Rares, F-59000 Lille, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Academic Editor: Daniel P. Potaczek
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(8), 3879; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22083879
Received: 9 March 2021 / Revised: 5 April 2021 / Accepted: 7 April 2021 / Published: 9 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Mechanisms of Allergy and Asthma)
Natural killer (NK) cells were originally described as cytolytic effector cells, but since then have been recognized to possess regulatory functions on immune responses. Chemokines locate NK cells throughout the body in homeostatic and pathological conditions. They may also directly stimulate immune cells. CCL18 is a constitutive and inducible chemokine involved in allergic diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate CCL18’s effect on NK cells from allergic and nonallergic donors in terms of both chemotactic and immune effects. Results showed that CCL18 was able to induce migration of NK cells from nonallergic donors in a G-protein-dependent manner, suggesting the involvement of a classical chemokine receptor from the family of seven-transmembrane domain G-protein-coupled receptors. In contrast, NK cells from allergic patients were unresponsive. Similarly, CCL18 was able to induce NK cell cytotoxicity only in nonallergic subjects. Purified NK cells did not express CCR8, one of the receptors described to be involved in CCL18 functions. Finally, the defect in CCL18 response by NK cells from allergic patients was unrelated to a defect in CCL18 binding to NK cells. Overall, our results suggest that some NK cell functions may be defective in allergic diseases. View Full-Text
Keywords: natural killer cell; CCL18; migration; cytotoxicity; allergy natural killer cell; CCL18; migration; cytotoxicity; allergy
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MDPI and ACS Style

Amniai, L.; Ple, C.; Barrier, M.; de Nadai, P.; Marquillies, P.; Vorng, H.; Chenivesse, C.; Tsicopoulos, A.; Duez, C. Natural Killer Cells from Allergic Donors Are Defective in Their Response to CCL18 Chemokine. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22, 3879. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22083879

AMA Style

Amniai L, Ple C, Barrier M, de Nadai P, Marquillies P, Vorng H, Chenivesse C, Tsicopoulos A, Duez C. Natural Killer Cells from Allergic Donors Are Defective in Their Response to CCL18 Chemokine. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2021; 22(8):3879. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22083879

Chicago/Turabian Style

Amniai, Latiffa, Coline Ple, Mathieu Barrier, Patricia de Nadai, Philippe Marquillies, Han Vorng, Cécile Chenivesse, Anne Tsicopoulos, and Catherine Duez. 2021. "Natural Killer Cells from Allergic Donors Are Defective in Their Response to CCL18 Chemokine" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 22, no. 8: 3879. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22083879

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