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Review

Lessons Learned from the Studies of Roots Shaded from Direct Root Illumination

1
Laboratory of Hormonal Regulations in Plants, Institute of Experimental Botany, Czech Academy of Sciences, 165 02 Prague, Czech Republic
2
Department of Experimental Plant Biology, Faculty of Science, Charles University, 128 00 Prague, Czech Republic
3
Department of Functional and Evolutionary Ecology, Molecular Systems Biology (MoSys), Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, Djerassiplatz 1, 1030 Wien, Austria
4
Vienna Metabolomics Center (VIME), University of Vienna, Djerassiplatz 1, 1030 Wien, Austria
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Bin Liu
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(23), 12784; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms222312784
Received: 22 October 2021 / Revised: 22 November 2021 / Accepted: 24 November 2021 / Published: 26 November 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Light as a Growth and Development Regulator to Control Plant Biology)
The root is the below-ground organ of a plant, and it has evolved multiple signaling pathways that allow adaptation of architecture, growth rate, and direction to an ever-changing environment. Roots grow along the gravitropic vector towards beneficial areas in the soil to provide the plant with proper nutrients to ensure its survival and productivity. In addition, roots have developed escape mechanisms to avoid adverse environments, which include direct illumination. Standard laboratory growth conditions for basic research of plant development and stress adaptation include growing seedlings in Petri dishes on medium with roots exposed to light. Several studies have shown that direct illumination of roots alters their morphology, cellular and biochemical responses, which results in reduced nutrient uptake and adaptability upon additive stress stimuli. In this review, we summarize recent methods that allow the study of shaded roots under controlled laboratory conditions and discuss the observed changes in the results depending on the root illumination status. View Full-Text
Keywords: D-rootsystem; direct root illumination; root growth; reactive oxygen species; flavonols; abiotic stress; light escape mechanism; auxin; cytokinin; dark-grown roots D-rootsystem; direct root illumination; root growth; reactive oxygen species; flavonols; abiotic stress; light escape mechanism; auxin; cytokinin; dark-grown roots
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lacek, J.; García-González, J.; Weckwerth, W.; Retzer, K. Lessons Learned from the Studies of Roots Shaded from Direct Root Illumination. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22, 12784. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms222312784

AMA Style

Lacek J, García-González J, Weckwerth W, Retzer K. Lessons Learned from the Studies of Roots Shaded from Direct Root Illumination. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2021; 22(23):12784. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms222312784

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lacek, Jozef, Judith García-González, Wolfram Weckwerth, and Katarzyna Retzer. 2021. "Lessons Learned from the Studies of Roots Shaded from Direct Root Illumination" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 22, no. 23: 12784. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms222312784

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