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Review

A Peek Inside the Machines of Bacterial Nucleotide Excision Repair

1
Doctor of Philosophy Program in Biochemistry (International Program), Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400, Thailand
2
Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400, Thailand
3
Center for Excellence in Protein and Enzyme Technology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400, Thailand
4
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, City College of New York, New York, NY 10031, USA
5
Doctor of Philosophy Programs in Biochemistry, Biology and Chemistry, The Graduate Center of the City University of New York, New York, NY 10016, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(2), 952; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22020952
Received: 28 November 2020 / Revised: 14 December 2020 / Accepted: 15 December 2020 / Published: 19 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recognition of DNA Lesions)
Double stranded DNA (dsDNA), the repository of genetic information in bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes, exhibits a surprising instability in the intracellular environment; this fragility is exacerbated by exogenous agents, such as ultraviolet radiation. To protect themselves against the severe consequences of DNA damage, cells have evolved at least six distinct DNA repair pathways. Here, we review recent key findings of studies aimed at understanding one of these pathways: bacterial nucleotide excision repair (NER). This pathway operates in two modes: a global genome repair (GGR) pathway and a pathway that closely interfaces with transcription by RNA polymerase called transcription-coupled repair (TCR). Below, we discuss the architecture of key proteins in bacterial NER and recent biochemical, structural and single-molecule studies that shed light on the lesion recognition steps of both the GGR and the TCR sub-pathways. Although a great deal has been learned about both of these sub-pathways, several important questions, including damage discrimination, roles of ATP and the orchestration of protein binding and conformation switching, remain to be addressed. View Full-Text
Keywords: nucleotide excision repair; NER; DNA repair; DNA damage recognition; UvrA; UvrB; UvrD; Mfd nucleotide excision repair; NER; DNA repair; DNA damage recognition; UvrA; UvrB; UvrD; Mfd
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kraithong, T.; Hartley, S.; Jeruzalmi, D.; Pakotiprapha, D. A Peek Inside the Machines of Bacterial Nucleotide Excision Repair. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22, 952. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22020952

AMA Style

Kraithong T, Hartley S, Jeruzalmi D, Pakotiprapha D. A Peek Inside the Machines of Bacterial Nucleotide Excision Repair. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2021; 22(2):952. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22020952

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kraithong, Thanyalak, Silas Hartley, David Jeruzalmi, and Danaya Pakotiprapha. 2021. "A Peek Inside the Machines of Bacterial Nucleotide Excision Repair" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 22, no. 2: 952. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22020952

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