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Dietary Phenolics against Breast Cancer. A Critical Evidence-Based Review and Future Perspectives

Laboratory of Food and Health, Research Group on Quality, Safety and Bioactivity of Plant Foods, Dept. Food Science and Technology, CEBAS-CSIC, P.O. Box 164, Campus de Espinardo, 30100 Murcia, Spain
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Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(16), 5718; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21165718
Received: 21 July 2020 / Revised: 6 August 2020 / Accepted: 8 August 2020 / Published: 10 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Bioactive Compounds and Breast Cancer)
Breast cancer (BC) is the most common malignancy and the leading cause of cancer-related death in adult women worldwide. Over 85% of BC cases are non-hereditary, caused by modifiable extrinsic factors related to lifestyle, including dietary habits, which play a crucial role in cancer prevention. Although many epidemiological and observational studies have inversely correlated the fruit and vegetable consumption with the BC incidence, the involvement of their phenolic content in this correlation remains contradictory. During decades, wrong approaches that did not consider the bioavailability, metabolism, and breast tissue distribution of dietary phenolics persist behind the large currently existing gap between preclinical and clinical research. In the present review, we provide comprehensive preclinical and clinical evidence according to physiologically relevant in vitro and in vivo studies. Some dietary phenolics such as resveratrol (RSV), quercetin, isoflavones, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), lignans, and curcumin are gaining attention for their chemopreventive properties in preclinical research. However, the clinical evidence of dietary phenolics as BC chemopreventive compounds is still inconclusive. Therefore, the only way to validate promising preclinical results is to conduct clinical trials in BC patients. In this regard, future perspectives on dietary phenolics and BC research are also critically discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: breast cancer; polyphenols; in vitro; animal models; clinical trials; dietary phenolics breast cancer; polyphenols; in vitro; animal models; clinical trials; dietary phenolics
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ávila-Gálvez, M.Á.; Giménez-Bastida, J.A.; Espín, J.C.; González-Sarrías, A. Dietary Phenolics against Breast Cancer. A Critical Evidence-Based Review and Future Perspectives. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21, 5718. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21165718

AMA Style

Ávila-Gálvez MÁ, Giménez-Bastida JA, Espín JC, González-Sarrías A. Dietary Phenolics against Breast Cancer. A Critical Evidence-Based Review and Future Perspectives. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2020; 21(16):5718. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21165718

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ávila-Gálvez, María Á.; Giménez-Bastida, Juan A.; Espín, Juan C.; González-Sarrías, Antonio. 2020. "Dietary Phenolics against Breast Cancer. A Critical Evidence-Based Review and Future Perspectives" Int. J. Mol. Sci. 21, no. 16: 5718. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21165718

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