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Open AccessReview

Signaling Crosstalk between Salicylic Acid and Ethylene/Jasmonate in Plant Defense: Do We Understand What They Are Whispering?

by 1,†, 2,3,†, 2,3,†, 1 and 1,*
1
State Key Laboratory of Cultivation and Protection for Non-Wood Forest Trees, Ministry of Education, Central South University of Forestry and Technology, Changsha 410004, China
2
College of Biological Science and Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350116, China
3
Biotechnology Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Science, Beijing 100081, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(3), 671; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20030671
Received: 9 January 2019 / Revised: 30 January 2019 / Accepted: 2 February 2019 / Published: 4 February 2019
During their lifetime, plants encounter numerous biotic and abiotic stresses with diverse modes of attack. Phytohormones, including salicylic acid (SA), ethylene (ET), jasmonate (JA), abscisic acid (ABA), auxin (AUX), brassinosteroid (BR), gibberellic acid (GA), cytokinin (CK) and the recently identified strigolactones (SLs), orchestrate effective defense responses by activating defense gene expression. Genetic analysis of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana has advanced our understanding of the function of these hormones. The SA- and ET/JA-mediated signaling pathways were thought to be the backbone of plant immune responses against biotic invaders, whereas ABA, auxin, BR, GA, CK and SL were considered to be involved in the plant immune response through modulating the SA-ET/JA signaling pathways. In general, the SA-mediated defense response plays a central role in local and systemic-acquired resistance (SAR) against biotrophic pathogens, such as Pseudomonas syringae, which colonize between the host cells by producing nutrient-absorbing structures while keeping the host alive. The ET/JA-mediated response contributes to the defense against necrotrophic pathogens, such as Botrytis cinerea, which invade and kill hosts to extract their nutrients. Increasing evidence indicates that the SA- and ET/JA-mediated defense response pathways are mutually antagonistic. View Full-Text
Keywords: hormones; signaling pathway; plant defense hormones; signaling pathway; plant defense
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MDPI and ACS Style

Li, N.; Han, X.; Feng, D.; Yuan, D.; Huang, L.-J. Signaling Crosstalk between Salicylic Acid and Ethylene/Jasmonate in Plant Defense: Do We Understand What They Are Whispering? Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20, 671. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20030671

AMA Style

Li N, Han X, Feng D, Yuan D, Huang L-J. Signaling Crosstalk between Salicylic Acid and Ethylene/Jasmonate in Plant Defense: Do We Understand What They Are Whispering? International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2019; 20(3):671. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20030671

Chicago/Turabian Style

Li, Ning; Han, Xiao; Feng, Dan; Yuan, Deyi; Huang, Li-Jun. 2019. "Signaling Crosstalk between Salicylic Acid and Ethylene/Jasmonate in Plant Defense: Do We Understand What They Are Whispering?" Int. J. Mol. Sci. 20, no. 3: 671. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20030671

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