Next Article in Journal
Contribution of a Novel B3GLCT Variant to Peters Plus Syndrome Discovered by a Combination of Next-Generation Sequencing and Automated Text Mining
Next Article in Special Issue
Discovery of a Highly Selective MC1R Agonists Pentapeptide to Be Used as a Skin Pigmentation Enhancer and with Potential Anti-Aging Properties
Previous Article in Journal
The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Acute Myeloid Leukaemia
Previous Article in Special Issue
Role of HYBID (Hyaluronan Binding Protein Involved in Hyaluronan Depolymerization), Alias KIAA1199/CEMIP, in Hyaluronan Degradation in Normal and Photoaged Skin
Open AccessReview

Role of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor in Environmentally Induced Skin Aging and Skin Carcinogenesis

1
IUF–Leibniz-Research Institute for Environmental Medicine, 40225 Düsseldorf, Germany
2
Laboratory of Experimental Dermatology, Department of Dermatology, Otto-von-Guericke University, 39120 Magdeburg, Germany
3
Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine University, 40225 Düsseldorf, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(23), 6005; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20236005
Received: 31 October 2019 / Revised: 22 November 2019 / Accepted: 27 November 2019 / Published: 28 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Mechanisms of Skin Aging)
The skin is constantly exposed to a variety of environmental threats, including solar electromagnetic radiation, microbes, airborne particulate matter, and chemicals. Acute exposure to these environmental factors results in the activation of different signaling pathways that orchestrate adaptive stress responses to maintain cell and tissue homeostasis. Chronic exposure of skin to these factors, however, may lead to the accumulation of damaged macromolecules and loss of cell and tissue integrity, which, over time, may facilitate aging processes and the development of aging-related malignancies. One transcription factor that is expressed in all cutaneous cells and activated by various environmental stressors, including dioxins, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and ultraviolet radiation, is the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). By regulating keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation, epidermal barrier function, melanogenesis, and immunity, a certain degree of AHR activity is critical to maintain skin integrity and to adapt to acute stress situations. In contrast, a chronic activation of cutaneous AHR signaling critically contributes to premature aging and the development of neoplasms by affecting metabolism, extracellular matrix remodeling, inflammation, pigmentation, DNA repair, and apoptosis. This article provides an overview of the detrimental effects associated with sustained AHR activity in chronically stressed skin and pinpoints AHR as a promising target for chemoprevention. View Full-Text
Keywords: DNA damage; extracellular matrix; extrinsic skin aging; melanoma; particulate matter; pigmentation; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; squamous cell carcinoma; UV radiation DNA damage; extracellular matrix; extrinsic skin aging; melanoma; particulate matter; pigmentation; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; squamous cell carcinoma; UV radiation
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Vogeley, C.; Esser, C.; Tüting, T.; Krutmann, J.; Haarmann-Stemmann, T. Role of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor in Environmentally Induced Skin Aging and Skin Carcinogenesis. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20, 6005.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop