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Article

Bacterial Diversity Correlates with Overall Survival in Cancers of the Head and Neck, Liver, and Stomach

1
Bioinformatics Core, Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii Mānoa, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA
2
Population Sciences in the Pacific Program-Cancer Epidemiology, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA
3
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Eylon Yavin
Molecules 2021, 26(18), 5659; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26185659
Received: 30 July 2021 / Revised: 15 September 2021 / Accepted: 15 September 2021 / Published: 17 September 2021
One in five cancers is attributed to infectious agents, and the extent of the impact on the initiation, progression, and disease outcomes may be underestimated. Infection-associated cancers are commonly attributed to viral, and to a lesser extent, parasitic and bacterial etiologies. There is growing evidence that microbial community variation rather than a single agent can influence cancer development, progression, response to therapy, and outcome. We evaluated microbial sequences from a subset of infection-associated cancers—namely, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSC), liver hepatocellular carcinoma (LIHC), and stomach adenocarcinoma (STAD) from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). A total of 470 paired tumor and adjacent normal samples were analyzed. In STAD, concurrent presence of EBV and Selemonas sputigena with a high diversity index were associated with poorer survival (HR: 2.23, 95% CI 1.26–3.94, p = 0.006 and HR: 2.31, 95% CI 1.1–4.9, p = 0.03, respectively). In LIHC, lower microbial diversity was associated with poorer overall survival (HR: 2.57, 95% CI: 1.2, 5.5, p = 0.14). Bacterial within-sample diversity correlates with overall survival in infection-associated cancers in a subset of TCGA cohorts. View Full-Text
Keywords: microbial diversity; tumor microenvironment; infection-associated cancers microbial diversity; tumor microenvironment; infection-associated cancers
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rodriguez, R.M.; Menor, M.; Hernandez, B.Y.; Deng, Y.; Khadka, V.S. Bacterial Diversity Correlates with Overall Survival in Cancers of the Head and Neck, Liver, and Stomach. Molecules 2021, 26, 5659. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26185659

AMA Style

Rodriguez RM, Menor M, Hernandez BY, Deng Y, Khadka VS. Bacterial Diversity Correlates with Overall Survival in Cancers of the Head and Neck, Liver, and Stomach. Molecules. 2021; 26(18):5659. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26185659

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rodriguez, Rebecca M., Mark Menor, Brenda Y. Hernandez, Youping Deng, and Vedbar S. Khadka. 2021. "Bacterial Diversity Correlates with Overall Survival in Cancers of the Head and Neck, Liver, and Stomach" Molecules 26, no. 18: 5659. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26185659

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