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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Comparison of Dilution, Filtration, and Microwave Digestion Sample Pretreatments in Elemental Profiling of Wine by ICP-MS

1
Department of Viticulture & Enology, University of California, One Shields Ave, Davis, CA 95616, USA
2
Food Safety & Measurement Facility, University of California, One Shields Ave, Davis, CA 95616, USA
3
Department of Food Science, The Pennsylvania State University, 202 Food Science Building, University Park, PA 16802, USA
4
Agilent Technologies, 5301 Stevens Creek Blvd, Santa Clara, CA 95051, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Molecules 2017, 22(10), 1609; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules22101609
Received: 1 September 2017 / Accepted: 23 September 2017 / Published: 25 September 2017
(This article belongs to the Collection Wine Chemistry)
Wine elemental composition varies by cultivar, geographic origin, viticultural and enological practices, and is often used for authenticity validation. Elemental analysis of wine by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) is challenging due to the potential for non-spectral interferences and plasma instability arising from organic matrix components. Sample preparation mitigates these interferences, however, conflicting recommendations of best practices in ICP-MS analysis of wine have been reported. This study compared direct dilution, microwave-assisted acid digestion, and two filtration sample pretreatments, acidification prior to filtration and filtration followed by acidification, in elemental profiling of one white and three red table wines by ICP-MS. Of 43 monitored isotopes, 37 varied by sample preparation method, with significantly higher results of 17 isotopes in the microwave-digested samples. Both filtration treatments resulted in lower results for 11 isotopes compared to the other methods. Finally, isotope dilution determination of copper based on natural abundances and the 63Cu:65Cu instrument response ratio agreed with external calibration and confirmed a significant sample preparation effect. Overall, microwave digestion did not compare favorably, and direct dilution was found to provide the best compromise between ease of use and result accuracy and precision, although all preparation strategies were able to differentiate the wines. View Full-Text
Keywords: ICP-MS; sample preparation; wine analysis; isotope dilution; elemental profiling ICP-MS; sample preparation; wine analysis; isotope dilution; elemental profiling
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MDPI and ACS Style

Godshaw, J.; Hopfer, H.; Nelson, J.; Ebeler, S.E. Comparison of Dilution, Filtration, and Microwave Digestion Sample Pretreatments in Elemental Profiling of Wine by ICP-MS. Molecules 2017, 22, 1609. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules22101609

AMA Style

Godshaw J, Hopfer H, Nelson J, Ebeler SE. Comparison of Dilution, Filtration, and Microwave Digestion Sample Pretreatments in Elemental Profiling of Wine by ICP-MS. Molecules. 2017; 22(10):1609. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules22101609

Chicago/Turabian Style

Godshaw, Joshua; Hopfer, Helene; Nelson, Jenny; Ebeler, Susan E. 2017. "Comparison of Dilution, Filtration, and Microwave Digestion Sample Pretreatments in Elemental Profiling of Wine by ICP-MS" Molecules 22, no. 10: 1609. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules22101609

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Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

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