Topic Editors

School of Environment, Hangzhou Institue for Advanced Study, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1st Xiangshan Zhinong, Xihu District, Hangzhou, China
Dr. ‪Myoseon Jang‬
Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, UK

Atmospheric Chemistry, Aging, and Dynamics

Abstract submission deadline
30 June 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
30 September 2024
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2431

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Air quality is currently the major issue that affects both human and nature environments. The primary anthropogenic air pollutants are usually sourced from urban and industrial activities and undergo atmospheric processes to form secondary pollutants, such as ozone and fine particulate matter. As air pollutants emitting into atmosphere, photochemical reactions and oxidations occur during the transport and transformation. In addition, the formation of secondary products through atmospheric aging and deposition process enables the cycling of elements (e.g., C, N, S, and O) in the atmosphere. This Topic will focus on the mechanism, observation, and simulation techniques used for studying atmospheric chemistry, aging, and dynamics. To understand the fate of air pollutants, formation, emission, transformation, chemistry, dispersion, long-range transport, deposition, and mixing of air pollutants in the atmosphere need to be investigated and studied.

In this Topic, original research articles and reviews are welcome. The main topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Aerosol and gas mixing;
  • Air pollutants in the urban environment;
  • Atmospheric chemistry in gas and aerosol formation;
  • Atmospheric chemistry in emission process;
  • Atmospheric oxidation and aging of air pollutants;
  • Atmospheric photochemical phenomenon;
  • Fate of air pollutants;
  • Long-range transport of air pollutants;
  • Tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry;
  • Secondary air pollutants (gas and aerosol).

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Zechen Yu
Dr. Myoseon Jang
Dr. Zhonghua Zheng
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • aerosol
  • aerosol mixing
  • air
  • air quality
  • atmospheric aging
  • atmospheric chemistry
  • atmospheric dynamics
  • atmospheric oxidation
  • pollutant
  • secondary air pollutants

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Atmosphere
atmosphere
2.9 4.1 2010 17.7 Days CHF 2400 Submit
Climate
climate
3.7 5.2 2013 19.7 Days CHF 1800 Submit
Environments
environments
3.7 5.9 2014 23.7 Days CHF 1800 Submit
Remote Sensing
remotesensing
5.0 7.9 2009 23 Days CHF 2700 Submit
Sustainability
sustainability
3.9 5.8 2009 18.8 Days CHF 2400 Submit

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Published Papers (3 papers)

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14 pages, 3304 KiB  
Article
A Surprisingly High Enhancing Potential of Nitric Acid in Sulfuric Acid–Methylamine Nucleation
by Fukang Qiao, Rongjie Zhang, Qiaojing Zhao, Fangfang Ma, Jingwen Chen and Hong-Bin Xie
Atmosphere 2024, 15(4), 467; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos15040467 - 10 Apr 2024
Viewed by 228
Abstract
Nitric acid (NA) has recently been found to enhance sulfuric acid (SA)-driven new particle formation (NPF) at low temperatures (≤240 K). However, studies on the role of NA in atmospheric NPF remain limited. Herein, we explored the enhancement effect of NA on binary [...] Read more.
Nitric acid (NA) has recently been found to enhance sulfuric acid (SA)-driven new particle formation (NPF) at low temperatures (≤240 K). However, studies on the role of NA in atmospheric NPF remain limited. Herein, we explored the enhancement effect of NA on binary SA–methylamine (MA) nucleation by investigating the mechanism and kinetics of (NA)x(SA)y(MA)z (0 ≤ x, 0 ≤ y, x + y ≤ 3, 0 ≤ z ≤ 3) clusters using quantum chemical calculations and cluster dynamics simulations. We found that the mixed ternary NA-SA-MA clusters have lower evaporation rates compared to the corresponding NA-SA–dimethylamine (DMA) and NA-SA–ammonia (A) clusters, indicating the stronger binding ability of NA with respect to SA-MA clusters. At atmospheric conditions (T ≥ 278.15 K), NA can enhance the cluster formation rate of SA-MA by about six orders of magnitude, demonstrating a surprisingly high enhancing potential. Moreover, NA acts as an important participant in the cluster growth pathways of the NA-SA-MA system, as opposed to the “bridging” role of NA in the previously studied NA-SA-A system. This study proposes the first case of NA efficiently enhancing SA–amine nucleation at ambient temperature, suggesting a larger impact of NA in atmospheric NPF than previously expected. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Atmospheric Chemistry, Aging, and Dynamics)
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17 pages, 5859 KiB  
Article
Characteristics of Absorbing Aerosols in Mexico City: A Study of Morphology and Columnar Microphysical Properties
by Giovanni Carabali, Faustino Juárez-Sánchez, Rafael N. Liñan-Abanto, Héctor Estévez, Mauro Valdés-Barrón, Roberto Bonifaz-Alfonso, David Riveros-Rosas and Adriana González-Cabrera
Atmosphere 2024, 15(1), 108; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos15010108 - 16 Jan 2024
Viewed by 792
Abstract
This paper presents an analysis of the morphology and columnar microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosols in Mexico City (MC) for the period 2022–2023. The morphological study focused on the structure description of soot particles and tar balls (TB). By transmission electron microscope (TEM) [...] Read more.
This paper presents an analysis of the morphology and columnar microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosols in Mexico City (MC) for the period 2022–2023. The morphological study focused on the structure description of soot particles and tar balls (TB). By transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning electrode microscope (SEM), voluminous soot aggregates mixed with TBs were observed. The chemistry shows that both soot and TBs are mostly carbonaceous species with well-defined morphologies. On the other hand, the columnar aerosol microphysical properties recovered from AERONET show that the particles have a bimodal aerosol size distribution (ASD) with two modes: fine and coarse. The ASD remains constant without showing significant seasonal changes, only with some variability for coarse particles. The aerosol optical depth (AOD) value is significantly high, typical of urban areas. The real (n) and imaginary (k) parts of the complex refractive index (CRI) were obtained from the photometric measurements. The CRI values show seasonal variations, with spring being the season with the highest values for n, while the highest values for k were measured in winter. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Atmospheric Chemistry, Aging, and Dynamics)
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13 pages, 3910 KiB  
Article
Chemical Characteristics and Sources Analysis of PM2.5 in Shaoxing in Winter
by Wenjuan Li, Jian Wu, Yangyi Zhou, Qiongzhen Wang, Fuwei Yu and Rupei Wang
Atmosphere 2023, 14(8), 1256; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos14081256 - 07 Aug 2023
Viewed by 791
Abstract
By analyzing the mass concentrations and compositions of atmospheric PM2.5 in Shaoxing from December 2019 to February 2020, the characteristics of carbon-containing components, water-soluble ions and metal elements were obtained. NO3, OC, SO42− and NH4+ [...] Read more.
By analyzing the mass concentrations and compositions of atmospheric PM2.5 in Shaoxing from December 2019 to February 2020, the characteristics of carbon-containing components, water-soluble ions and metal elements were obtained. NO3, OC, SO42− and NH4+ were the main components of PM2.5 in winter. The OC/EC ratio was 3.27, which proved the existence of SOC. The proportion of SOC in OC was 47.3%, which showed that secondary sources made a significant contribution. The values of OC/EC and NO3/SO42− indicated that vehicle exhaust emissions also made a significant contribution to PM2.5. Trace elements of Na, Ca, K and Cd had higher enrichment factor values and were enriched due to human activities. Finally, PM2.5 sources analysis was performed by the positive matrix factorization model. The results showed that secondary inorganic salts (49.3%), motor vehicles and industrial sources (21.3%) and dust sources (17.0%) were the important sources of PM2.5 pollution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Atmospheric Chemistry, Aging, and Dynamics)
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