Topic Editors

Department of Industrial Engineering, Keimyung University, Daegu 42601, Republic of Korea
Prof. Dr. Inseok Lee
School of Social Safety Systems Engineering, Hankyong National University, Anseong 17579, Republic of Korea

New Advances in Musculoskeletal Disorders

Abstract submission deadline
10 November 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
10 January 2025
Viewed by
1932

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are the leading contributor to disability worldwide, with lower back pain being the single leading cause of disability across 160 countries. Disability associated with MSDs has been increasing, and it is projected to rapidly increase in the coming decades due to population increase and aging. MSDs are considered work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) if an event or exposure in the work environment either caused or contributed to the resulting disorders or significantly aggravated a pre-existing disorder. In the USA, 272,780 WMSD cases were reported in 2018, with the incidence rate of 27.2 per 10,000 full-time workers, accounting for approximately 30% of all occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work. Therefore, it is crucial to survey the prevalence and risk factors of WMSDs and to develop preventive measures to reduce WMSDs.

This Topic focuses on updating our knowledge concerning WMSDs. New research papers, reviews, case studies and any WMSDs relevant studies are also welcome to this Topic. The major themes of which are as follows:

  • Prevalence of WMSDs by industry and country;
  • Symptoms by body parts;
  • Smart assessment tools and their applications in industry;
  • Interventions and their effects;
  • Relationships between risk factors and specific WMSDs;
  • Diagnosis methods;
  • Effects of individual differences and psychosocial, environmental, and organizational factors on WMSDs.

Prof. Dr. Dohyung Kee
Prof. Dr. Inseok Lee
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • musculoskeletal disorders
  • work-related musculoskeletal disorders
  • musculoskeletal disorder risk factors
  • musculoskeletal load
  • posture classification scheme
  • observational techniques
  • postural load

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Diagnostics
diagnostics
3.6 3.6 2011 20.7 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Healthcare
healthcare
2.8 2.7 2013 19.5 Days CHF 2700 Submit
Journal of Clinical Medicine
jcm
3.9 5.4 2012 17.9 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology
jfmk
- 3.7 2016 17.6 Days CHF 1600 Submit
Medicina
medicina
2.6 3.6 1920 19.6 Days CHF 1800 Submit

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Published Papers (3 papers)

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12 pages, 770 KiB  
Article
The Flexion Relaxation Phenomenon in Patients with Radiculopathy and Low Back Pain: A Cross-Sectional Study
by Marijan Peharec, Stanislav Peharec, Vedran Srhoj-Egekher, Romana Jerković, Dean Girotto and Gordana Starčević-Klasan
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2024, 9(2), 77; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk9020077 - 19 Apr 2024
Viewed by 237
Abstract
Although the measurements of the lumbar spine and pelvic flexion have shown that subjects with radiculopathy exhibited greater decreases of motion when compared with subjects with low back pain, there is still a lack of evidence regarding the changes in flexion relaxation ratio [...] Read more.
Although the measurements of the lumbar spine and pelvic flexion have shown that subjects with radiculopathy exhibited greater decreases of motion when compared with subjects with low back pain, there is still a lack of evidence regarding the changes in flexion relaxation ratio in patients with radiculopathy. The aims of this study were to investigate the flexion relaxation ratio and flexion of the lumbar spine and pelvis in subjects with low back pain (LBP) and LBP with radiculopathy (LBPR) in comparison with healthy subjects (CG—control group). A total of 146 participants were divided in three groups: LBP patients (54 males; 21 females); LBPR patients (26 males; 11 females); and CG subjects (16 males; 18 females). The lumbar spine and pelvis flexion was recorded using optoelectronic motion capture system. The electrical activity of the erector spinae muscles was assessed by surface electromyography during flexion-extension movements. Comparisons between groups were made using one-way ANOVA tests and Mann–Whithney U test with the level of statistical significance at 0.05. The lumbar and pelvic flexion and electromyography of the erector spinae muscle showed significant differences between LBP and LBPR patients compared to CG. Patients LBPR showed significantly smaller angles of lumbar and pelvic flexion compared to LBP patients and CG. An increase in the erector spinae muscle activity during flexion was also observed in patients with radiculopathy. The increased muscular activity of the erector spinae is related to the reduced flexion of the lumbar spine in order to protect the lumbar spine structure. Measurements of trunk, lumbar spine and pelvic flexion, and the flexion relaxation ratio may allow us to predict better outcomes or responsiveness to treatment of LBPR patients in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic New Advances in Musculoskeletal Disorders)
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9 pages, 2586 KiB  
Technical Note
Arthroscopic Medialization Partial Repair with Biologic Interposition Tuberoplasty for Large to Massive Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tear
by Jae-Wook Jung, Joong-Bae Seo, Jun-Yeul Lee and Jae-Sung Yoo
Medicina 2024, 60(3), 484; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina60030484 - 14 Mar 2024
Viewed by 610
Abstract
An irreparable rotator cuff tear is a challenging condition to treat, and various treatment modalities are being introduced. Medialization in the partial repair method has the limitation of exposing the tuberosity, while tension-free biologic interposition tuberoplasty using acellular dermal matrix has the limitation [...] Read more.
An irreparable rotator cuff tear is a challenging condition to treat, and various treatment modalities are being introduced. Medialization in the partial repair method has the limitation of exposing the tuberosity, while tension-free biologic interposition tuberoplasty using acellular dermal matrix has the limitation of exposing the humeral head. The authors believe that by combining these two techniques, it is possible to complement each other’s limitations. Therefore, they propose a surgical method that combines medialization and biologic interposition tuberoplasty for addressing these constraints. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic New Advances in Musculoskeletal Disorders)
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11 pages, 1176 KiB  
Article
Musculoskeletal Pain, Physical Activity, Muscle Mass, and Mortality in Older Adults: Results from the Korean Longitudinal Study on Health and Aging (KLoSHA)
by Sun-Woo Hwang, Chang-Woo Kim, Yun-Jeong Jang, Chang-Han Lee, Min-Kyun Oh, Ki-Woong Kim, Hak-Chul Jang, Jae-Young Lim, Se-Woong Chun and Seung-Kyu Lim
Medicina 2024, 60(3), 462; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina60030462 - 11 Mar 2024
Viewed by 753
Abstract
Background and objectives: Musculoskeletal (MSK) pain significantly impacts physical activity and quality of life in older adults, potentially influencing mortality. This study explored the relationship between MSK pain, physical activity, muscle mass, and mortality among older adults. Material and Methods: We studied 1000 [...] Read more.
Background and objectives: Musculoskeletal (MSK) pain significantly impacts physical activity and quality of life in older adults, potentially influencing mortality. This study explored the relationship between MSK pain, physical activity, muscle mass, and mortality among older adults. Material and Methods: We studied 1000 participants in the Korean Longitudinal Study on Health and Aging (KLoSHA), a prospective, population-based cohort study of people aged 65 years or older. Survival status was tracked over a 5-year period. Correlations between low back pain (LBP), knee pain, regular exercise, appendicular skeletal muscle mass (ASM), and other variables were analyzed. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify independent risk factors for mortality. Results: Of the total participants, 829 (82.9%) survived over a 5-year period. Survivors tended to be younger, had a higher BMI, and were more active in regular exercise. In contrast, non-survivors exhibited a higher prevalence of both LBP and knee pain, along with increased instances of multiple MSK pains. Lower ASM correlated moderately with LBP and knee pain, whereas higher ASM was associated with regular exercise. There was a moderate correlation between LBP and knee pain, both of which were associated with a lack of regular exercise. Age, sex, ASM, and regular exercise were significant predictors, even though MSK pain itself did not directly predict all-cause mortality. Conclusions: This study demonstrated the independent association between ASM, regular exercise, and mortality. Although MSK pain did not directly correlate with all-cause mortality, the non-survivor group had higher levels of both single and multiple MSK pains. Recognizing the interplay of MSK pain, physical activity, and muscle mass for older adults, the research underscores the need for holistic strategies to enhance health outcomes in older individuals with MSK pain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic New Advances in Musculoskeletal Disorders)
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