Topic Editors

Maxillofacial Surgery Operative Unit, University Hospital of Naples "Federico II", 80131 Naples, Italy
Dr. Chiara Copelli
Maxillofacial Surgery Operative Unit, Department of Interdisciplinary Medicine, Aldo Moro University of 12 Bari, 70120 Bari, Italy

Current Challenges and Advances in Skin Repair and Regeneration

Abstract submission deadline
closed (20 April 2024)
Manuscript submission deadline
20 July 2024
Viewed by
3239

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

The skin is the human body's first barrier, and acts as a defense against external stimuli, protecting against damage and injury. The structure of the skin is complex: it is composed of the epidermis, dermis, and subcutaneous fat, acting as a barrier against the penetration of damaging UV rays from the sun, the invasion of harmful pathogens, and the evaporation of water, thereby protecting the underlying organs.

In clinical practice, the interruption of skin integrity can be caused by different external factors which range from an iatrogenic or post-traumatic excision to a severe loss of tissue, such as in relation to an ulcer, or even to an alteration of the skin structure by chemicals or heat.

Since skin represent the most extended and most visible organ of the human body, growing attention is given to its healing and its reconstruction. In the last few years, we have observed an increased interest in skin repair and regeneration to improve the positive results achievable with autologous grafts, either with full or partial thickness. Today, we observe a rising focus on dermal substitutes. They represent a valid option in the reconstruction of wound with large amount of dermal loss or with great scar retraction. Larger defects can be approached by the adoption of microsurgery and the harvesting of free flaps. Recently, innovative research studies have proposed the application of mesenchymal stem-cell-derived exosomes and nano-sized vesicles able to induce strong anti-inflammatory, anti-aging, and wound-healing effects, thereby easing the regenerative process.

One of the most complex skin districts to reconstruct is the facial region: here the skin has very varied characteristics changing thickness and elasticity, encountering very important vascular-nervous structures.

Dr. Giovanni Salzano
Dr. Chiara Copelli
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • skin repair
  • skin regeneration
  • dermal substitute
  • burn injuries
  • skin defects
  • autologous graft
  • post-traumatic injuries
  • chemical injury
  • local flap
  • free flap

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Biomedicines
biomedicines
4.7 3.7 2013 15.4 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Journal of Clinical Medicine
jcm
3.9 5.4 2012 17.9 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Journal of Personalized Medicine
jpm
3.4 2.6 2011 17.8 Days CHF 2600 Submit

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Published Papers (3 papers)

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16 pages, 3400 KiB  
Article
Comparison of Intact Fish Skin Graft and Allograft as Temporary Coverage for Full-Thickness Burns: A Non-Inferiority Study
by Randolph Stone II, Emily C. Saathoff, David A. Larson, John T. Wall, Nathan A. Wienandt, Skuli Magnusson, Hilmar Kjartansson, Robert J. Christy and Shanmugasundaram Natesan
Biomedicines 2024, 12(3), 680; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines12030680 - 18 Mar 2024
Viewed by 764
Abstract
The extent and depth of burn injury may mandate temporary use of cadaver skin (allograft) to protect the wound and allow the formation of granulation tissue while split-thickness skin grafts (STSGs) are serially harvested from the same donor areas. However, allografts are not [...] Read more.
The extent and depth of burn injury may mandate temporary use of cadaver skin (allograft) to protect the wound and allow the formation of granulation tissue while split-thickness skin grafts (STSGs) are serially harvested from the same donor areas. However, allografts are not always available and have a high cost, hence the interest in identifying more economical, readily available products that serve the same function. This study evaluated intact fish skin graft (IFSG) as a temporary cover to prepare the wound bed for STSG application. Thirty-six full-thickness (FT) 5 × 5 cm burn wounds were created on the dorsum of six anesthetized Yorkshire pigs on day −1. To mimic the two-stage clinical situation, on day 0, wounds were excised down to a bleeding wound bed and a temporary cover (either IFSG or cadaver porcine skin) was applied; then, on day 7, wounds were debrided to a viable wound bed prior to the application of autologous 1.5:1 meshed STSG (mSTSG). Rechecks were performed on days 14, 21, 28, 45, and 60 with digital images, non-invasive measurements, and punch biopsies. The IFSG created a granulated wound bed receptive to the application of an mSTSG. FT burn wounds treated with an IFSG had similar outcome measures, including contraction rates, trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) measurements, hydration, and blood perfusion levels, compared to cadaver skin-treated burn wounds. Pathology scoring indicated significant differences between the allograft- and IFSG-treated wounds on day 7, with the IFSG having increased angiogenesis, granulation tissue formation, and immune cells. Pathology scoring indicated no significant differences once mSTSGs were applied to wounds. The IFSG performed as well as cadaver skin as a temporary cover and was not inferior to the standard of care, suggesting the potential to transition IFSGs into clinical use for burns. Full article
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10 pages, 406 KiB  
Review
Fresh Frozen Homologous Rib Cartilage: A Narrative Review of a New Trend in Rhinoplasty
by Giovanni Salzano, Giovanni Audino, Giovanni Dell’Aversana Orabona, Umberto Committeri, Stefania Troise, Antonio Arena, Luigi Angelo Vaira, Pietro De Luca, Alfonso Scarpa, Andrea Elefante, Antonio Romano, Luigi Califano and Pasquale Piombino
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(6), 1715; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13061715 - 16 Mar 2024
Viewed by 482
Abstract
Background: Revision rhinoplasty is a technically demanding surgical procedure that can put every surgeon in trouble. The main issue of these cases is often an altered osteocartilaginous framework following over-resection during the first intervention. Moreover, the available septal or auricular cartilage for [...] Read more.
Background: Revision rhinoplasty is a technically demanding surgical procedure that can put every surgeon in trouble. The main issue of these cases is often an altered osteocartilaginous framework following over-resection during the first intervention. Moreover, the available septal or auricular cartilage for grafting is usually not enough. This review aims to examine contemporary advances in applications of fresh frozen cartilage in rhinoplasty. Methods: A structured review of the current literature (up to December 2023) was performed on four bibliographic databases: PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane and Medline. The search terms were combinations of “Rhinoplasty” and “Cartilage Graft”, “Allograft” or “Fresh Frozen Cartilage”. The citations of selected studies and review articles were also evaluated if present. Results: The research resulted in 152 articles, and only ten met the inclusion criteria: nine clinical articles and one in vitro study. One of the ten eligible articles was excluded. Conclusions: Fresh frozen rib cartilage proved to be a viable alternative to autologous rib grafts and irradiated homologous rib graft. Despite the higher costs, FFRG can provide a sufficient amount of tissue for grafting avoiding donor site complications and reducing the operative time and proved to have more chondrocytes and to be less prone to resorption compared to irradiated rib. Full article
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11 pages, 1616 KiB  
Review
Severe Acute Ischemia of Glans Penis after Achieving Treatment with Only Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy: A Rare Case Report and Systematic Literature Review
by Adrian Hașegan, Ionela Mihai, Dan Bratu, Ciprian Bacilă, Mihai Dan Roman, Cosmin Ioan Mohor, Adrian Teodoru, Sabrina Birsan, Cosmin Mutu, Călin Chibelean, Maria Totan, Nicolae Grigore, Gabriela Iancu, Horatiu Dura and Adrian Boicean
J. Pers. Med. 2023, 13(9), 1370; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm13091370 - 12 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1345
Abstract
Acute ischemia of the glands is a severe complication after circumcision. We outline the challenging case of a seventeen-year-old boy with glandular ischemia (GI) that appeared shortly after circumcision. Methods: We present a case report and literature review related to glans ischemia, and [...] Read more.
Acute ischemia of the glands is a severe complication after circumcision. We outline the challenging case of a seventeen-year-old boy with glandular ischemia (GI) that appeared shortly after circumcision. Methods: We present a case report and literature review related to glans ischemia, and the complications of circumcision are reviewed. We note that there are very few cases described in the literature. Our patient was successfully treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) after four days of no positive effect after all medical and surgical treatments written in the literature: Subcutaneous enoxaparin, local application of a glyceryl trinitrate, continuous epidural perfusion, intravenous pentoxifylline, alprostadil, intraoperative drainage, and aspiration with saline solution and epinephrine. Clinical improvement was noted at the first session of HBOT. A number of days after the operation, the penis looked normal and was healing. Complete healing of the penile glans was successfully realized one month after surgery. Conclusion: Based on the review and the case presented, we conclude that HBOT is the treatment of choice for acute ischemia of the penile glans, especially when other treatments do not work. Full article
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