Special Issue "Water Resources, Socio-Economic Development and the Environment"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Resources Management, Policy and Governance".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Evan G. R. Davies
Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Faculty of Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Alberta
Interests: water resources management, water resources modeling, integrated assessment, systems thinking, and sustainable development

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

This special issue on systems modelling of water resources calls for studies that explicitly connect socio-economic activity with water resources at river-basin to global scales.  Our emphasis is on advanced computer modelling of these systems for water resources management, and for more general policy assessment and development, but we also welcome non-modelling papers relevant to water systems modelling.  Ideal papers will address aspects of water supply and demand and their dynamic linkages over the medium to long-term, multiple water use sectors (municipal, industrial, agricultural, environmental), and relatively short (sub-annual) temporal scales that capture important natural and socio-economic variability.

Why systems modelling?  Population growth, economic development and irrigation expansion have driven dramatic increases in fresh water demands over the last century, while ongoing socio-economic development, climate change and threats to water quality render water supply into the future uncertain and its provision potentially costly.  Awareness of growing water scarcity and its potential for socio-economic disruption has led to increasing interest in systems modelling of water resources at regional to global scales.   Such studies emphasize the role of feedbacks between human and hydrological systems, and connect the two through concepts like water security, socio-hydrology, the water-energy-food nexus and integrated water resources management.  The application of computer modelling approaches can serve decision-makers and other stakeholders by improving their understanding of coupled human and hydrological systems, and informing water resources infrastructure and management decisions.  In this special issue, we will profile recent water systems modelling efforts to advance the state-of-the-art in modelling complex, dynamic water resources systems and their linkages to socio-economic and environmental change.

Prof. Dr. Evan G. R. Davies
Prof. Dr. Jan Franklin Adamowski
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Water resources systems
  • Water security
  • Water-energy-food nexus
  • Socio-hydrology
  • Integrated water resources management
  • Integrated assessment
  • Hydro-economic modeling

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Comprehensive Analysis of Coordination Relationship between Water Resources Environment and High-Quality Economic Development in Urban Agglomeration in the Middle Reaches of Yangtze River
Water 2020, 12(5), 1301; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12051301 - 05 May 2020
Abstract
Water resources environment and high-quality economic development both have crucial significance to sustainable development. To explore the nexus between them, an integrated evaluation system was firstly established in this study on the basis of their complicated synergy mechanism. Secondly, the index weights of [...] Read more.
Water resources environment and high-quality economic development both have crucial significance to sustainable development. To explore the nexus between them, an integrated evaluation system was firstly established in this study on the basis of their complicated synergy mechanism. Secondly, the index weights of urban agglomeration in the middle reaches of the Yangtze River from 2008 to 2017 were calculated by project pursuit-entropy weight method (PP-EWM) combined with an immune grey wolf optimizer algorithm (IGWO). Finally, the static and dynamic coordination degrees of 31 cities in the urban agglomeration were measured by membership function coordination model (MFCM), and the temporal and spatial characteristics of the coordination degrees were analyzed. The results showed that: (1) most cities in the urban agglomeration still had some room for improvement in terms of the water resources environment and high-quality economic development; (2) according to the changing characteristics of static coordination degrees, 31 cities were divided into five types, namely constantly rising type, constantly declining type, rising-declining type, declining-rising type and fluctuation type; (3) the dynamic coordination degrees demonstrated that the number of well coordinated cities decreased in recent years, and Xinyu and three provincial cities (i.e., Wuhan, Changsha and Nanchang) had poor performances. Overall, this study contributed to decision-making on synergic improvement between the water resources environment and high-quality economic development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Resources, Socio-Economic Development and the Environment)
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Open AccessArticle
An Empirical Research on Influence Factors of Industrial Water Use
Water 2019, 11(11), 2267; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11112267 - 29 Oct 2019
Abstract
The contradiction between increasing demand and current supply has affected the healthy development of industry. Investigating the key influence factors of industrial water use change has important practical significance for water resource management. In this study, the authors propose the vector autoregression model [...] Read more.
The contradiction between increasing demand and current supply has affected the healthy development of industry. Investigating the key influence factors of industrial water use change has important practical significance for water resource management. In this study, the authors propose the vector autoregression model to analyze the dynamic influences of industrial development, technological progress, and environmental protection on industrial water use change, and take Jiangsu Province, China as a case study. Results show that each of the factors had different effects during 2001–2015, in which industrial development was the greatest contributor to the change of industrial water use and showed a positive effect in the forecast period; technological progress played a major role in reducing industrial water use, but the negative effect weakened periodically over time; environmental protection also had a positive influence in the early forecast period, and then showed a marginal effect with time. Results of this study could assist the relevant authorities to formulate appropriate industrial development planning and water saving policies, and to reasonably control the industrial water demand. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Resources, Socio-Economic Development and the Environment)
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