Special Issue "Water Microbial Contamination and Bioremediation"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Aquatic Systems—Quality and Contamination".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Catarina Teixeira
Website
Guest Editor
CIIMAR—University of Porto, Porto, Portugal
Interests: water quality; biogeochemistry; bioremediation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Clean water is one of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. Microbial pollution in aquatic environments is a the critical aspect in the quality assessment of water bodies used for drinking-water supply, recreational activities, seafood harvesting, and aquaculture, as a result of potential contamination by pathogenic bacteria, viruses, or parasitic protozoa. Rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters are experiencing increased anthropogenic pressure, resulting in water quality deterioration. Besides microbiological water quality decline, nutrient enrichment on inland and coastal waters also presents a major threat by increasing the activity of the primary producers, leading to harmful or toxic algal blooms and eutrophication events.

Monitoring data at relevant spatial and temporal scales under natural environmental variability and diverse ecosystems is essential for drawing and implementing effective protection measures. Water contamination can be limited by reducing contaminant inputs, but also by applying remedial measures to mitigate the negative impacts. However, the design and implementation of remediation strategies is challenging because of the complex dynamics of aquatic ecosystems. Research on new and holistic solutions combining technology and ecology are in dire need in order to support the sustainable management of aquatic resources.

Dr. Catarina Teixeira
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • water quality
  • bacteria
  • microbial dynamics
  • nutrients
  • remediation
  • rivers
  • estuaries
  • coastal waters

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Contamination Status of Salmonella spp., Shigella spp. and Campylobacter spp. in Surface and Groundwater of the Kelani River Basin, Sri Lanka
Water 2020, 12(8), 2187; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12082187 - 04 Aug 2020
Abstract
Waterborne diseases are a global problem that causes more than 2.2 million deaths annually. Therefore, the present study was focused on microbiological contamination of both ground and surface water by means of total coliform, Escherichia coli (E. coli), Salmonella spp., Shigella [...] Read more.
Waterborne diseases are a global problem that causes more than 2.2 million deaths annually. Therefore, the present study was focused on microbiological contamination of both ground and surface water by means of total coliform, Escherichia coli (E. coli), Salmonella spp., Shigella spp. and Campylobacter spp. Seventy two groundwater and 45 surface water sampling locations were selected to collect water from the head, transitional and meandering regions of the Kelani River Basin for a period of one year (both dry and wet seasons). The results of the study revealed that the entire Kelani River basin was contaminated with total coliform and E. coli bacteria and almost all the sampling locations exceed Sri Lanka Standards Institute (SLSI) guideline value given for drinking water (0 CFU/100 mL). Further, in groundwater, 17 locations were positive for Salmonella spp., whereas only 2 locations were positive for Campylobacter spp. In surface water, 26 and three sampling locations were positive for Salmonella spp. and Campylobacter spp., respectively. In this study, 23 different human pathogenic serovars were isolated and the Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky was identified as the commonest type. Thus, the result of the study revealed that the consumption of raw water from the Kelani River Basin is unsafe and possible to cause gastrointestinal diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Microbial Contamination and Bioremediation)
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Open AccessArticle
Control of Nuisance Cyanobacteria in Drinking Water Resources Using Alternative Algae-Blocking Mats
Water 2020, 12(6), 1576; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12061576 - 31 May 2020
Abstract
The water intake facility of Paldangho Lake (PIF), constructed in 1988, supplies drinking water to the Seoul metropolitan area and satellite city (ca. 20 million inhabitants) in South Korea. A nuisance cyanobacterial bloom (CB) has been observed every year in the PIF. Thus, [...] Read more.
The water intake facility of Paldangho Lake (PIF), constructed in 1988, supplies drinking water to the Seoul metropolitan area and satellite city (ca. 20 million inhabitants) in South Korea. A nuisance cyanobacterial bloom (CB) has been observed every year in the PIF. Thus, related governments have been funding the control of CBs and algal-originated materials (AOMs). In this study, an algae-blocking mat (ABM) was developed to protect against CBs and AOMs considering temperature and water depth. We evaluated the daily and monthly performance of the ABM on phytoplankton, pH, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll-a, and light intensity between April and October 2015. Although the average cell abundance of cyanobacteria between July and September approached the warning level of the Korea alert system, the highest algal removal efficiency was recorded as 92% in August when the cyanobacterial cells were over 66,000 cells/mL. On average, the ABM showed a low removal efficiency of 26% on both geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol, whereas total phytoplankton was more than 30%. In conclusion, our results indicate that the ABM may be an economical blocking tool for nuisance cyanobacteria in drinking water resources, considering AOMs and total phytoplankton. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Microbial Contamination and Bioremediation)
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