Special Issue "Water Quality and Contaminant Transport in Aquatic Environments"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Quality and Contamination".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2022) | Viewed by 2953

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Ali Saber
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto, 1065 Military Trail, Toronto, ON M1C 1A4, Canada
Interests: water quality modeling; hydrodynamic modeling; machine learning; data mining; climate change; wastewater treatment; water reuse; water resource management; sustainability of freshwater resources; physical limnology
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Increased industrialization and population growth have substantially enhanced the demand for sustainable water supplies. A large number of inland and coastal waters, particularly those located in the vicinity of urban areas, suffer from contamination due to anthropogenic activities. Therefore, the development of technologies for more rigorous water quality monitoring and application methodologies for accurate modeling of the fate and transport of contaminants in aquatic environments are of paramount importance.

This Special Issue aims to present a collection of experimental, computational, and monitoring studies pertaining to the physical, chemical, and biological processes influencing the fate and transport of anthropogenic and naturally occurring contaminants in aquatic environments. Particular emphasis is placed on studies investing the bioaccumulation, degradation, partitioning, and transformation of both legacy and emerging contaminants as well as fieldwork and modeling studies characterizing the mixing and transport processes in water bodies and their interactions with atmosphere and sediments. Topics of interest include but are not limited to:    

  • Hydrodynamic and water quality modeling;
  • Occurrence of eutrophication and harmful algal blooms in marine and freshwater systems;
  • Bioaccumulation of contaminants in the aquatic food chain;
  • Novel sensors, detection methods, and monitoring approaches;
  • Surface and groundwater hydrogeology/hydraulics;
  • Pathogen tracking and risk assessment;
  • Regulatory requirements and compliance;
  • Degradation, transformation, and accumulation of legacy and emerging contaminants in aquatic systems;
  • Environmental restoration;
  • Application machine learning and soft computing methods in water quality monitoring and assessment.

Dr. Ali Saber
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • aquatic biogeochemistry
  • solute mixing and transport
  • bioaccumulation
  • contaminants of emerging concern (CECs)
  • natural and artificial tracers
  • water quality
  • aquatic ecosystems
  • environmental fluid dynamics
  • harmful algal blooms (HABs)
  • microbial risk assessment (MRA)

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Communication
The Impact of Water Temperature on In-Line Turbidity Detection
Water 2022, 14(22), 3720; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14223720 - 17 Nov 2022
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Abstract
Turbidity measurements are influenced by environmental factors such as water temperature. We designed experiments to study whether water temperature affects in-line turbidity detection and the potential influence mechanism. A turbidity meter installed in-line could self-record data, including the water temperature and turbidity values. [...] Read more.
Turbidity measurements are influenced by environmental factors such as water temperature. We designed experiments to study whether water temperature affects in-line turbidity detection and the potential influence mechanism. A turbidity meter installed in-line could self-record data, including the water temperature and turbidity values. From our experimental analysis, we verified the influence of water temperature on the in-line turbidity. Moreover, the temperature coefficient should not be obtained from the experiment directly because the intrinsic impact of in-line turbidity detection does not come from water temperature. Instead, the effect is derived from the optical components’ heat change. When the water temperature change is insignificant, the in-line turbidity deviation caused by the water temperature can be ignored. However, when the water temperature changes substantially, the in-line turbidity sensor should compensate for the temperature drift. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Quality and Contaminant Transport in Aquatic Environments)
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Article
Assessment of a Multi-Layer Aquifer Vulnerability Using a Multi-Parameter Decision-Making Method in Mosha Plain, Iran
Water 2022, 14(21), 3397; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14213397 - 26 Oct 2022
Viewed by 402
Abstract
In recent decades, there has been a growing emphasis on assessing aquifer vulnerability. Given the availability of spatial data and the GIS advantages, mapping the groundwater vulnerability has become a common tool for protecting and managing groundwater resources. Here, we applied the GIS [...] Read more.
In recent decades, there has been a growing emphasis on assessing aquifer vulnerability. Given the availability of spatial data and the GIS advantages, mapping the groundwater vulnerability has become a common tool for protecting and managing groundwater resources. Here, we applied the GIS indexing and an overlay method to explore a combination of the potential contamination factors needed to assess groundwater vulnerability in the Mosha aquifer. The data from a borehole data logger and chemical analysis of spring water show groundwater responses to the surface contaminating sources. To assess the aquifer vulnerability, the potential contaminating sources were classified into three groups, namely (1) geological characteristics such as lithology and structural geology features; (2) the infrastructures induced by human activities such as roads, water wells, and pit latrines; and (3) land use. By considering these components, the risk maps were produced. Our findings indicate that the aquifer is very responsive to the anthropogenic contaminants that may leak into the aquifer from urbanized areas. Additionally, roads and pit latrines can significantly release pollutants into the environment that may eventually leak into the aquifer and contaminate the underlying groundwater resources. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Quality and Contaminant Transport in Aquatic Environments)
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Article
The Ability of a Bacterial Strain to Remove a Phenolic Structure as an Approach to Pulp and Paper Mill Wastewater Treatment: Optimization by Experimental Design
Water 2022, 14(20), 3296; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14203296 - 19 Oct 2022
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Abstract
High-colored wastewater generated during the cellulose bleaching process causes the inhibition of biological activity when released into the environment. This study aimed to evaluate the bacterium’s capacity, identified as RGM2262, to degrade a complex phenolic structure such as lignin, which is found in [...] Read more.
High-colored wastewater generated during the cellulose bleaching process causes the inhibition of biological activity when released into the environment. This study aimed to evaluate the bacterium’s capacity, identified as RGM2262, to degrade a complex phenolic structure such as lignin, which is found in high concentrations in the effluents generated during the production of cellulose, raw material for the manufacture of paper. To determine the values of the experimental variables that allow for a greater degradation of organic matter, an experimental model was carried out through experimental design. Thus, the experimental matrix was obtained with the variables pH 7 (−1) to 9 (+1) and a treatment time of 1 day (−1) to 5 days (+1). The results show that, at pH 8 and pH 9, both treatments—with bacteria in bio-films and without bio-films—were efficient. On the second day of treatment, 100% of the color and the phenolic structure were removed, with a similar rate constant, and at the same time, 80% COD and 70% of TOC, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Quality and Contaminant Transport in Aquatic Environments)
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Article
Close Association between Stream Water Quality and Fluorescence Properties of Dissolved Organic Matter in Agriculture-Dominated Watersheds
Water 2022, 14(16), 2459; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14162459 - 09 Aug 2022
Viewed by 662
Abstract
The characteristics of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and its relationships with other environmental factors are beneficial for comprehending water pollution in watersheds. This study aimed to improve our understanding of the association of DOM with water quality by connecting the spectroscopic characteristics of [...] Read more.
The characteristics of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and its relationships with other environmental factors are beneficial for comprehending water pollution in watersheds. This study aimed to improve our understanding of the association of DOM with water quality by connecting the spectroscopic characteristics of DOM with land cover and land use (LCLU). Clustering the tributaries of the Miho upstream watershed according to LCLU resulted in Clusters 1 and 2 having a large proportion of farmland and a large forest area, respectively. Various fluorescence indices derived from fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectra revealed that livestock effluent resulted in the enrichment of autochthonous organic matter of algal or microbial origin in catchment areas with a high proportion of farmland. Furthermore, to analyze water quality changes according to the land-use characteristics, the water quality and spectroscopic characteristics of DOM were utilized based on the period of farmland use. Further correlation analysis indicated a high correlation between the fluorescence index (FI) in Cluster 1 and organic matter parameters and nitrogenous pollution (Total nitrogen (TN), Dissolved total nitrogen (DTN) and Nitrate nitrogen (NO3-N)) (planting season, r = 0.991, post-planting season, r = 0.971). This suggests that the FI can be used as a surrogate to estimate the degree of water pollution in watersheds largely affected by land uses related to agricultural activity and the livestock industries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Quality and Contaminant Transport in Aquatic Environments)
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Article
The Impacts of Precipitation on Fluorescent Dissolved Organic Matter (FDOM) in an Urban River System
Water 2022, 14(15), 2323; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14152323 - 27 Jul 2022
Viewed by 708
Abstract
Precipitation is considered a key factor influencing the fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) of urban rivers. However, the multiple effects of precipitation on FDOM in urban rivers and the long-term impacts of precipitation on the spatial patterns of FDOM are seldom known. Spatiotemporal [...] Read more.
Precipitation is considered a key factor influencing the fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) of urban rivers. However, the multiple effects of precipitation on FDOM in urban rivers and the long-term impacts of precipitation on the spatial patterns of FDOM are seldom known. Spatiotemporal variations of FDOM at 36 sites from the urban rivers of Jinan City during dry and wet seasons were investigated in this study. Four components were identified using an excitation–emission matrix and parallel factor analysis. Overall, the total fluorescence intensities in dry and wet seasons ranged from 6.59 to 35.7 quinine sulfate units (QSU) and 3.42 to 69.3 QSU, respectively. Significant variations were found for different components that C2 and C3 declined but C4 increased in the wet season (p < 0.05). The temporal variations for different components could be explained by the different combined effects of precipitation dilution and flushing. Three different reference FDOM sources, including background water, spring water, and wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) outlets, were illustrated using principal coordinate analysis (PCoA). The places of FDOM in most sites were more closed to the PCoA location of WWTP outlets in the dry season while central shifted in the wet season. The changes of FDOM sources in the wet season could be explained by the mixed effect of precipitation. In conclusion, this study provided new insights into the multiple impacts of precipitation on FDOM in urban river systems, and also data support for precise pollution discharge and water resource management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Quality and Contaminant Transport in Aquatic Environments)
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