Special Issue "Hydrological Modeling in Urban Water Management"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Urban Water Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2021) | Viewed by 3711

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Fabrice Rodriguez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
GERS Laboratoire Eau et Environnement Université Gustave Eiffel - IFSTTAR/ IRSTV
Interests: urban hydrology; stormwater management; environmental monitoring; GIS; SUDS; natural-based solutions
Dr. Jorge Gironás
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Departamento de Ingeniería Hidráulica y Ambiental, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, and Centro de Desarrollo Urbano Sustentable (CEDEUS), Chile
Interests: urban hydrology; stormwater management; sustainable development; climate change; floods; natural hazards; river basin morphology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Water resources in urban environments are essential. Cities and peri-urban areas take place in the basin and, thus, water resources are used and also impacted significantly. Together with monitoring and measuring, hydrological modeling becomes key in characterizing, assessing, and predicting these uses and impacts, and developing strategies and practices to assure the long-term sustainability of cities. New developments and applications in hydrological modeling are constantly needed to represent the complex hydrological and biophysical interactions within urbanization and between urbanization and the basin. Moreover, such studies must account for a variety of global change manifestations (i.e., changes in climate, land use, and population) as well as sociopolitical issues while providing solid scientific bases for the planning and management of cities and water systems. Although very comprehensive and detailed models are currently under development, simple conceptual models are still needed as they facilitate our understanding of fundamental process and clearly illustrate the effects of the main attributes of the urbanization and the river basin.

For this Special Issue, we seek state-of-the art contributions from all over the world addressing a variety of challenges in hydrological modeling for urban water management. Topics of relevance for this issue include:

  • Continuous simulation in urban water management;
  • The application of hydrological modeling to the understanding and prediction of interactions between urbanization, surface water, and groundwater;
  • Modeling of sustainable urban drainage systems and low-impact development practices as well as their effect over the entire flow regime;
  • Modeling of water schemes for the provision of water in cities, such as those based on rain harvesting and graywater reuse;
  • Urban water management and decision making in urban planning and management.
  • Climate change impacts over urban water management and mitigation strategies.
  • Water management and urban ecology;
  • Hydrological modeling at the city scale;
  • Evaluation of distributed modeling approaches.

Dr. Fabrice Rodriguez
Dr. Jorge Gironás
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • urban water
  • hydrological modeling
  • surface–subsurface hydrological modeling
  • stormwater
  • sustainable drainage
  • urban planning
  • urban ecology

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Development and Evaluation of a Saturated Zone Module in an Integrated Urban Hydrological Model
Water 2022, 14(7), 1030; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14071030 - 24 Mar 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 666
Abstract
Shallow urban groundwater interacts with surface water and underground infrastructures. Low-impact development in urban water management by at-source infiltration should consider shallow urban groundwater in a holistic manner. Traditional hydrological models, however, rarely detail groundwater flows and their interaction with urban runoff and [...] Read more.
Shallow urban groundwater interacts with surface water and underground infrastructures. Low-impact development in urban water management by at-source infiltration should consider shallow urban groundwater in a holistic manner. Traditional hydrological models, however, rarely detail groundwater flows and their interaction with urban runoff and the water budget. In the present study, a new approach is proposed, using the integration of a flow module WTI for the saturated zone in a distributed urban hydrological model URBS-MO. This integration is carried out by paying attention to retaining the initial waterflow subsurface parameterization. The performance of the integrated model is evaluated by piezometric and runoff data in an experimental urban catchment, through a sensitivity analysis and a manual calibration of the main model parameters, as well as a validation step. The new module shows its capacity to improve groundwater flow simulation by assessing more realistic water table variations, along with a very small improvement of flowrate simulation. The bias on the average groundwater level was reduced from +14 to +7% for the one-year validation period. The modelling results show the importance of parameter calibration for distributed physically-based hydrological models. Difficulties in the calibration of parameter values due to spatial heterogeneities are also revealed, as the use of piezometric data for the calibration of a hydrological model is rather innovative. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrological Modeling in Urban Water Management)
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Article
Stormwater Runoff Modelling in an Urban Catchment to Plan Risk Management for Contaminant Spills for Stormwater Harvesting
Water 2021, 13(20), 2865; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13202865 - 14 Oct 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 707
Abstract
Water quality is a key consideration for urban stormwater harvesting via aquifers. This study assessed catchment spill management options based on a calibrated dynamic wave routing model of stormwater flow in an urban catchment. The study used measured travel times, pluviometer and gauging [...] Read more.
Water quality is a key consideration for urban stormwater harvesting via aquifers. This study assessed catchment spill management options based on a calibrated dynamic wave routing model of stormwater flow in an urban catchment. The study used measured travel times, pluviometer and gauging station observations from 21 storms to calibrate a stormwater model to simulate transport of pollutants from spill locations to the point of harvest. The simulations considered the impact of spill locations, spill durations, storm intensities and storm durations on the pollutant concentration at the point of harvest and travel time of a pollutant spill to the harvesting point. During dry weather, spill events travelled slower than spills occurring during wet weather. For wet weather spills, the shortest travel times tended to occur in higher intensity storms with shorter duration, particularly when a spill occurred in the middle of the storm. Increasing the intensity of rainfall reduced the peak concentration of pollutant at the harvest point via dilution, but it also reduced the time of travel. On a practical level, due to the short response times in urban catchments, management of spills should be supported by automated detection/diversion systems to protect stormwater harvesting schemes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrological Modeling in Urban Water Management)
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Article
Development and Application of a SWMM-Based Simulation Model for Municipal Scale Hydrologic Assessments
Water 2021, 13(12), 1644; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13121644 - 11 Jun 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1537
Abstract
There is growing interest for the installation of green stormwater infrastructure (GSI) to improve stormwater control, increase infiltration of stormwater, and improve receiving water body quality. Planning level tools are needed to inform municipal scale decisions on the type and extent of GSI [...] Read more.
There is growing interest for the installation of green stormwater infrastructure (GSI) to improve stormwater control, increase infiltration of stormwater, and improve receiving water body quality. Planning level tools are needed to inform municipal scale decisions on the type and extent of GSI to apply. Here, a modified methodology is developed for the EPA Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) to create SWMM for Low Impact Technology Evaluation (SWWM-LITE) that enables municipal scale assessment of stormwater control measure (SCM) performance with minimal input data requirements and low processing time. Hydrologic outputs of SWMM-LITE are compared to those for SWMM and the National Stormwater Calculator (SWC) to assess the performance of SWMM-LITE. Three scenarios including the baseline without SCMs and the installation of varying SCMs were investigated. Across the three scenarios, SWMM-LITE estimates of annual average hydrologic performance (runoff, infiltration, and evaporation) were within +/−0.1% of estimates from a rigorously developed SWMM model in the City of Fort Collins, CO, for an evaluation of 30 years of continuous simulation. Analysis conducted for 2 year (y), 10 y, and 100 y storm events showed less than +/−2.5% difference between SWMM and SWMM-LITE hydrologic outputs. SWC provided reasonable estimates of hydrologic parameters for the case study area, but was designed for site level analyses of performance of SCMs rather than on the municipal scale. A sensitivity analysis revealed that the most sensitive parameters were primarily consistent for the SWMM-LITE and the complete SWMM. SWMM-LITE has low input data requirements and processing time and can be applied for assessing the hydrologic performance of SCMs to inform planning level decisions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrological Modeling in Urban Water Management)
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