Special Issue "Forms, Functions and Values of Treescapes (Natural and Urban)"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water, Agriculture and Aquaculture".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2021) | Viewed by 1299

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Matteo Rubinato
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Energy, Construction and Environment & Centre for Agroecology, Water and Resilience, Coventry University, Coventry CV1 5FB, UK
Interests: hydraulics; environmental fluid mechanics; urban and coastal flooding; sustainable urban drainage systems; pollutant transport; river regulation; dynamic water surface patterns; advanced experimental flow measurement; climate change mitigation and adaptation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Craig Lashford
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Energy, Construction and Environment & Centre for Agroecology, Water and Resilience, Coventry University, Coventry CV1 5FB, UK
Interests: sustainable drainage; urban flooding; flood modelling; natural flood risk management; hydrological monitoring
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Sophia Shuang Chen
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Geographic Sciences, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, 219 Ningliu Road, Nanjing, China
Interests: green space provision; urban stream water quality assessment; land use/cover change and its environmental effects; urban sustainable development and watershed ecosystem management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Treescapes are environments and landscapes in which trees play a major role. These types of environments can be found within forests, as well as in agricultural and urban areas. Treescapes offer a variety of social, economic, and environment benefits to the community, such as resilience to climate change through carbon sequestration and flood attenuation, improved health outcomes, increasing property values, supporting agriculture, providing habitats, and benefiting biodiversity.

Recent reports from the IPCC confirmed the need to remove fossil fuels from our economy, but in order to reduce CO2 in the atmosphere, it is necessary to put much more carbon back into the landscape. To achieve this, more plant matter and more soil carbon are needed; and, consequently, this means more trees, which are considered an essential part of urban infrastructure and are crucial to the liveability and economic and environmental sustainability of cities.

However, considering the modern urban–rural interface, land development is more frequently linked to a decrease in trescapee areas. Continuous urban development targets land of open spaces, and puts the preservation and conservation of ecosystems at risk, as well as urban sustainability. It is therefore extremely important to provide a better understanding of these changing dynamics, and to clearly support the protection of these environments that can provide long-term resiliency to climate change.

This Special Issue is set up to receive research papers investigating the forms, functions, and values of treescapes across the world, with the aim of identifying opportunities, barries, and feasible possibilities for expansion of these types of landscapes, making the entire world more resilient to climate change. This Special Issue is open to experimental, numerical, theoretical and studies, as well as field works.

Dr. Matteo Rubinato
Dr. Craig Lashford
Prof. Sophia Shuang Chen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • landscaping
  • urban greenery
  • urban ecology
  • public space
  • flood management
  • sustainable agriculture
  • flow reduction
  • climate change
  • forestry
  • treescapes

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Modelling the Hydrological Effects of Woodland Planting on Infiltration and Peak Discharge Using HEC-HMS
Water 2021, 13(21), 3039; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13213039 - 31 Oct 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 928
Abstract
Woodland planting is gaining momentum as a potential method of natural flood management (NFM), due to its ability to break up soil and increase infiltration and water storage. In this study, a 2.2 km2 area in Warwickshire, England, planted with woodland every [...] Read more.
Woodland planting is gaining momentum as a potential method of natural flood management (NFM), due to its ability to break up soil and increase infiltration and water storage. In this study, a 2.2 km2 area in Warwickshire, England, planted with woodland every year from 2006 to 2012, was sampled using a Mini Disk infiltrometer (MDI). Infiltration measurements were taken from 10 and 200 cm away from the trees, from November 2019 to August 2021. Two individual hydrological models were built using the US Hydraulic Engineering Center Hydrological Modelling System (HEC-HMS), to model the effects of infiltration change on peak flows from the site throughout the summer and winter. The models were calibrated and validated using empirical data; the Nash and Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE) was used as an indicator of accuracy. Results from this study show that woodland planting reduced peak flow intensity compared to impermeable land cover by an average of 6%, 2%, and 1% for 6-h, 24-h, and 96-h winter storms, respectively, and 48%, 18%, and 3% for 6-h, 24-h, and 96-h summer storms, respectively. However, grassland simulations show the greatest reduction in peak flows, being 32%, 21%, and 10%, lower than woodland for 6-, 24-, and 96-h winter storms, respectively, and 6%, 3%, and 0.5% lower than woodland for 6-, 24-, and 96-h summer storms, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Forms, Functions and Values of Treescapes (Natural and Urban))
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