Special Issue "Stormwater Management in Urban and Rural Areas"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Urban Water Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2022) | Viewed by 4160

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Jan K. Kazak
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Spatial Management, Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Grunwaldzka 55, 50-357 Wrocław, Poland
Interests: sustainable cities and regions; adaptation to climate change; environmental impact assessment; natural resource management; resilience; urban design and planning
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Jolanta Dąbrowska
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Building Engineering, Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences
Interests: sustainable water resources management; urban drought; stormwater management in urban and rural areas; water scarcity; climate change adaptation and urban resilience
Dr. Agnieszka Bednarek
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
UNESCO Chair on Ecohydrology and Applied Ecology, University of Łodz, Faculty of Biology and Environmental Protection, Poland
Interests: ecohydrology approach for freshwater management; nutrient management for preventing freshwater ecosystems; biotechnology for increasing denitrification effectivity/nitrogen removal in ecosystems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In past decades, traditional stormwater management in urban and rural areas was associated with a rapid transfer of water to sewage systems or ditches, which resulted in carrying pollutants and large volumes of water to rivers and streams. Such an approach caused negative changes in the hydrological cycle, as well as groundwater resources depletion, deterioration of water quality and damages to ecosystems.

However, increasing urbanization, along with the intensification of agricultural production and progressive climate change have forced a paradigm shift.
Thus, a new approach to stormwater concerns increasing retention, infiltration, and groundwater recharge, reducing surface runoff and using stormwater treatment methods that mimic nature. Stormwater becomes a valuable resource, especially with the risk of drought growing year after year and extreme temperatures becoming more frequent. The holistic approach considers creating resistant functional ecological systems, and in their creation and maintenance economic factors, environment, social wellbeing, and public health are all taken into account.
Sustainable stormwater management provides ecosystem services and benefits for people from the environment. In cities, grey, blue, and green infrastructure is combined into an integral whole. Stormwater management has finally become an invaluable part of creating a low-carbon, energy-efficient, healthy, and citizen-friendly city. Rural sustainable drainage systems are a group of measures that can be created with a minimal loss of agricultural production areas. Their application involves reducing erosion and flooding and the negative impact of agricultural diffuse pollution, as well as increasing biodiversity and limiting water loss.
The Special Issue welcomes papers focused on the latest knowledge related with sustainable stormwater management. Relevant topics include but are not limited to the following areas:

  • Stormwater management in response to climate change;
  • Sponge cities;
  • Blue and green infrastructure;
  • Sustainable urban drainage systems (SUDS);
  • Rural sustainable drainage systems (RSuDS);
  • Water-sensitive urban design;
  • Stormwater quality, quantity, and treatment methods;
  • Integrated urban drainage models;
  • Urban exposure to flood and drought hazards;
  • Rainfall modeling and simulation;
  • Stakeholder involvement in stormwater management;
  • Remote sensing and GIS applications for sustainable stormwater management;
  • Ecohydrology as an integral component of stormwater management.

Dr. Jan K. Kazak
Dr. Jolanta Dąbrowska
Dr. Agnieszka Bednarek
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainable stormwater management
  • urban design
  • adaptation to climate change
  • low impact development
  • policy instruments
  • extreme weather events
  • agricultural diffuse pollution
  • surface runoff
  • resilient cities

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Article
Attracting the Private Sector to Urban Stormwater: A Feasible Task or Just a Pipe Dream?
Water 2022, 14(14), 2164; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14142164 - 08 Jul 2022
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Abstract
Private sector participation (PSP) in stormwater drainage and management systems is desirable for two reasons: firstly, for its capacity to contribute resources, allowing existing public budgets to be used for other purposes, and secondly for its capacity to introduce management efficiency. Despite the [...] Read more.
Private sector participation (PSP) in stormwater drainage and management systems is desirable for two reasons: firstly, for its capacity to contribute resources, allowing existing public budgets to be used for other purposes, and secondly for its capacity to introduce management efficiency. Despite the apparent simplicity of this conceptualization, in practice, such participation does not occur simply out of a desire to improve service delivery. Private and public partners have their interests, which are, on the private side, the profit margins and deadlines for return on investments, and on the public side, representing society, the obligations of equity, universality, continuity, and the sustainability of service provision and infrastructure. Reconciling these often-contradictory aspects requires complex and sophisticated political, institutional, organizational and regulatory structures aligned to provide incentives, resources, and involves everyone. Without exhausting the subject, this article addresses several aspects related to the attractiveness and participation of private initiatives in urban stormwater management and discusses some international examples with a special focus on Brazil. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stormwater Management in Urban and Rural Areas)
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Article
Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the SED-BIO System in Reducing the Inflow of Selected Physical, Chemical and Biological Pollutants to a Lake
Water 2022, 14(2), 239; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14020239 - 14 Jan 2022
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Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the efficiency of the innovative SED-BIO system in limiting the inflow of pollutants to Jelonek Lake. The analyses were conducted in the Gniezno Lake District in Greater Poland (the western part of Poland). Physical and [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to assess the efficiency of the innovative SED-BIO system in limiting the inflow of pollutants to Jelonek Lake. The analyses were conducted in the Gniezno Lake District in Greater Poland (the western part of Poland). Physical and chemical analyses were conducted in the years 2016–2019. The results demonstrate that the system is highly effective in the reduction of such nutrients as nitrogen (NO3—63%; NH4+—14.9%) and phosphorus (PO43−—19.3%). Although the presence of cyanobacteria was confirmed practically throughout the whole monitoring period of the system (2016), the specimens found in most samples were not toxigenic genotypes with a potential to produce microcystins. Microcystins (3 µg·L−1) were detected only once, immediately after the SED-BIO system had been installed in the river and pond, which demonstrates that this natural toxin was eliminated from the additional pool of contaminants that might be transported to Jelonek Lake. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stormwater Management in Urban and Rural Areas)
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Article
Experimenting Transition to Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems—Identifying Constraints and Unintended Processes in a Tropical Highly Urbanized Watershed
Water 2020, 12(12), 3554; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12123554 - 17 Dec 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1062
Abstract
Green Infrastructure promotes the use of natural functions and processes as potential solutions to reduce negative effects derived from anthropocentric interventions such as urbanization. In cities of Latin America, for example, the need for more nature-based infrastructure is evident due to its degree [...] Read more.
Green Infrastructure promotes the use of natural functions and processes as potential solutions to reduce negative effects derived from anthropocentric interventions such as urbanization. In cities of Latin America, for example, the need for more nature-based infrastructure is evident due to its degree of urbanization and degradation of ecosystems, as well as the alteration of the local water cycle. In this study, an experimental approach for the implementation of a prototype is presented. The prototype consists of a gray-hybrid element for first flush bio-treatment and runoff detention, adapted to the existing stormwater sewer. The experiment took place in a highly urbanized watershed located in the Metropolitan Area of Costa Rica. The characteristics of the existing infrastructure in the study area at different scales were mapped and compared using the Urban Water System Transition Framework. Subsequently, preferences related to spatial locations and technologies were identified from different local decision-makers. Those insights were adopted to identify a potential area for the implementation of the prototype. The experiment consisted of the adaptation of the local sewer to act as a temporal reservoir to reduce the effects derived from rapid generation of stormwater runoff. Unexpected events, not considered initially in the design, are reported in this study as a means to identify the necessary adaptations of the methodology. Our study shows from an experimental learning-experience that the relation between different actors advocating for such technologies influences the implementation and operation of non-conventional technologies. Furthermore, the willingness of residents to modify their urban environments was found to be associated to their own perceptions about security and vandalism occurring in green spaces. The implementation of the prototype showed that both the hydraulic performance is relevant for considering it as a success, as well as the dynamics of the adapted element with the existing urban conditions. In consequence, those aspects should be carefully considered as the design factors of engineering elements when they are related to complex socio-ecological urban systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stormwater Management in Urban and Rural Areas)
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Commentary
Understanding China’s Urban Rainstorm Waterlogging and Its Potential Governance
Water 2021, 13(7), 891; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13070891 - 24 Mar 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1083
Abstract
Urban rainstorm waterlogging is one of the most important problems in urban development and a comprehensive embodiment of urban diseases. China is facing a severe risk of rainstorm waterlogging disasters, which is affecting sustainable development. Urban rainstorm waterlogging in China is caused by [...] Read more.
Urban rainstorm waterlogging is one of the most important problems in urban development and a comprehensive embodiment of urban diseases. China is facing a severe risk of rainstorm waterlogging disasters, which is affecting sustainable development. Urban rainstorm waterlogging in China is caused by many factors, including natural factors and human factors, such as climate warming, unreasonable urban construction, inadequate upgrading of urban fortification standards, etc. Based on the analysis of the current strategies to deal with urban waterlogging around the world, including an increase in surface infiltration, and a reduction in runoff (and its various impacts), this paper holds that the connotation and goal of these measures are highly consistent with the construction of a sponge city in China. Based on the analysis of the problems, including construction of an urban rainwater recovery system, construction of urban rainwater storage facilities, and construction of data platforms faced by China’s sponge city, this paper puts forward the guiding principles of promoting the construction of a sponge city. The guiding principles are to cooperate to deal with climate change and ecological civilization construction, to study the foreign experience, and to unite multiple subjects, integrate multiple elements, design multiple processes, form a joint force, and create an all-round response system to deal with urban rainstorm waterlogging. Then, this paper gives policy recommendations on how to deal with the urban rainstorm waterlogging disasters, which include improving the defense standards, encouraging social participation, popularizing the construction of sponge cities, perfecting the monitoring and early warning system, strengthening the scientific planning of cities, strengthening the ability of dealing with catastrophes in metropolitan areas, the overall planning of cross-regional responses, and enhancing the awareness of decision makers. Finally, this paper expounds the reference significance of urban rainstorm waterlogging control in China to the global audience. This paper explores the significance of comprehensively and scientifically understanding urban rainstorm waterlogging disasters, and provides support for long-term planning and high-quality construction of future safe cities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stormwater Management in Urban and Rural Areas)
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