Special Issue "Social-Hydrological Resilience: Perspectives and Insights in Social-Hydrological Resilience Research"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Resources Management, Policy and Governance".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2022 | Viewed by 4372

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Timos Karpouzoglou
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Division of History of Science, Technology & Environment, KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Interests: water; power; politics; social–hydrological resilience; equity; Global South

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Social-hydrological resilience is an expanding area of research that brings attention to the complexity of human-water relations undergoing change. It brings particular attention to the fact that humans and water are fundamentally related but also that flexibility and adaptability to change are going to be crucial for the water sector to cope with global change and to avoid transgressing critical planetary boundaries.

Social-hydrological resilience has gained particular attention across both hydrological and the social science communities in order to fully capture the complexity of human-water relations. Thus far the concept has been developed through research focusing on specific case studies but also conceptual discussion papers have been developed linking the human water interface and focusing on specific water challenges such as floods, droughts, and water ecosystem restoration.

In this Special Issue, the focus is on further advancing this field and in particular developing new perspectives and insights in social-hydrological resilience research. In this Special Issue, social science perspectives are especially encouraged, however interdisciplinary points of view are also welcome. The Special Issue thus invites contributions from different disciplines that can connect to one or more of the following themes:

  1. Perspectives on the role of resilience in addressing human-water interactions;
  2. Insights from case studies examining different water bodies (i.e. rivers, lakes, and wetlands) and regions (e.g. urban, rural, peri-urban)
  3. Insights about the role of power and politics;
  4. Insights about the interaction of different bodies of knowledge and social groups (such as state, expert and citizen);
  5. Perspectives on the role of social equity considerations.
  6. Insights from the use of novel methodological approaches, including quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-method approaches.

The Special Issue invites contributions that build upon research experiences across the Global North and Global South. Contributions from the Global South are especially encouraged.

Dr. Timos Karpouzoglou
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Social-hydrological
  • Resilience
  • Water
  • Human-water interactions
  • Power
  • Politics
  • Social equity
  • Knowledge

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Using Adaptive Capacity to Shift Absorptive Capacity: A Framework of Water Reallocation in Highly Modified Rivers
Water 2022, 14(2), 193; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14020193 - 11 Jan 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 552
Abstract
Damming and water regulation creates highly modified rivers with limited ecosystem integrity and resilience. This, coupled with an ongoing global biodiversity crisis, makes river restoration a priority, which requires water reallocation. Coupled human–natural systems research provides a suitable lens for integrated systems’ analysis [...] Read more.
Damming and water regulation creates highly modified rivers with limited ecosystem integrity and resilience. This, coupled with an ongoing global biodiversity crisis, makes river restoration a priority, which requires water reallocation. Coupled human–natural systems research provides a suitable lens for integrated systems’ analysis but offers limited insight into the governance processes of water reallocation. Therefore, we propose an analytical framework, which combines insight from social–hydrological resilience and water reallocation research, and identifies the adaptive capacity in highly modified rivers as the capacity for water reallocation. We test the framework by conducting an analysis of Sweden, pre- and post-2019, a critical juncture in the governance of the country’s hydropower producing rivers. We identify a relative increase in adaptive capacity post- 2019 since water reallocation is set to occur in smaller rivers and tributaries, while leaving large-scaled rivers to enjoy limited water reallocation, or even increased allocation to hydropower. We contend that the proposed framework is broad enough to be of general interest, yet sufficiently specific to contribute to the construction of middle-range theories, which could further our understanding of why and how governance processes function, change, and lead to outcomes in terms of modified natural resource management and resilience shifts. Full article
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Article
Analysis of Socio-Hydrological Evolution Processes Based on a Modeling Approach in the Upper Reaches of the Han River in China
Water 2021, 13(18), 2458; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13182458 - 07 Sep 2021
Viewed by 828
Abstract
The Han River is the water source of the South-to-North Water Diversion Project and the “Han River to Wei River Water Diversion Project” in China. In order to ensure that the water quality and quantity are sufficient for the water diversion project, the [...] Read more.
The Han River is the water source of the South-to-North Water Diversion Project and the “Han River to Wei River Water Diversion Project” in China. In order to ensure that the water quality and quantity are sufficient for the water diversion project, the natural forest protection project, river chief system and other measures have been implemented in the Han River by the government. At the same time, several large reservoirs have been built in the Han River basin and perform the functions of water supply and hydropower generation, which is an important type of clean power. Under the influence of human activities, the coupling interaction between humans and water in the upper reach of the Han River drives the socio-hydrological evolution process. In this study, from the perspective of socio-hydrology, a model of socio-hydrological evolution (SHE) in the Han River in southern Shaanxi was built to simulate the potential evolution path of the socio-hydrological system and determine possible measures for the sustainable governance of the river basin. By adjusting the model parameters, four future scenarios were established: natural continuation, economic development, environmental protection and industrial adjustment scenarios. Taking 2018 as the base year, the evolution of socio-hydrology in the upper reaches of the Han River was predicted under the four scenarios from 2019 to 2045. The simulation results show that: (1) In the entire study area, except for domestic water, the water consumption of other departments show an upward or stable trend. There are differences in water consumption changes in the upper and lower sections, which are related to the different socio-economic conditions. (2) Comparing different development scenarios, the industrial adjustment and environmental protection scenarios are superior to the other scenarios. Natural continuation and economic development scenarios appear to be unfavorable for the sustainability of water resources and the economy. (3) In addition, based on the development scenarios, some policy suggestions are put forward, such as reducing the irrigation water quota, appropriately adjusting the industrial structure and promoting the growth of the urban population and the development of urbanization. Full article
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Article
Worldwide Research on Socio-Hydrology: A Bibliometric Analysis
Water 2021, 13(9), 1283; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13091283 - 30 Apr 2021
Cited by 21 | Viewed by 2252
Abstract
The technical and scientific analysis regarding studies of the water surface or groundwater has increasingly taken on a great social impact, which has led to the creation of the term socio-hydrology. Since decision making has a greater weight, considering the social perspective, its [...] Read more.
The technical and scientific analysis regarding studies of the water surface or groundwater has increasingly taken on a great social impact, which has led to the creation of the term socio-hydrology. Since decision making has a greater weight, considering the social perspective, its study has become more important in the past 20 years. This article aims to carry out a bibliometric analysis related to socio-hydrology using the Scopus database and the application of VOSviewer software for the evaluation of the intellectual structure of socio-hydrology, its conceptual evolution, and its tendencies. The methodology considers (i) search criteria of the research field, (ii) search and document selection, (iii) software and data extraction, and (iv) analysis of results and trends. The results show us the term socio-hydrology as a new scientific discipline that has traces in the Scopus database in the past two decades. However, its application stems from recognising ancestral knowledge alongside other forms of knowledge. Socio-hydrology practice requires participatory models, where the community has a great influence, and for the most part, it guarantees results for the common good. The trend of this topic is growing and open to the criteria of sustainability. Full article
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