Special Issue "Efficient Practices of Land Use Management for Water Resources Protection"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Resources Management, Policy and Governance".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Gabriele Chiogna
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Technical University of Munich (Chair of Hydrology and River Basin Management), University of Innsbruck (Innovation lab for Sustainable Resources Management)
Interests: hydrology; sustainable water resources management; groundwater
Dr. Guido Rianna
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Regional Models and Geo-Hydrological Impacts (REMHI) Division, CMCC Foundation Euro-Mediterranean Center on Climate Change, 73100 Lecce, Italy
Interests: slope stability; hydrological modeling; water balance; evapotranspiration modeling; hydro-thermal modeling; landslides; evaporation; unsaturated soil
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We invite you to submit your latest research findings showing progresses about the topic “Efficient Practices of Land-Use Management for Water Resources Protection’’ to a Special Issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441), an open-access journal (https://www.mdpi.com/journal/water).

Customized and target-oriented land-use activities for water resources protection are urgently needed in order to guarantee the quantity and quality of this precious resource. Challenges in the planning and implementation of best management practices rely on balancing conflicts between different stakeholders and the adaptation to uncertain climate change scenarios. Moreover, an integrated and modern concept of land-use management also requires considering best management practices that can enhance flood and drought prevention. Considering climate change and land-use change can lead to a reconsideration of the currently employed management practices that are considered sustainable under present conditions.

This Special Issue has the aim of collecting relevant case studies in which novel land-use best management practises are developed, modelled, or implemented to increase or guarantee secure access to water resources. Interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary research works on governance issues related to the implementation of such practices and on solving stakeholder conflicts are also of interest for this Special Issue. Regional review or comparative studies depicting the current situation, at least at a national level, are also welcome if they are able to highlight the research needs to overcome the currently identified challenges.

Prof. Dr. Gabriele Chiogna
Dr. Guido Rianna
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Land-use management
  • Drinking water
  • Climate change adaptation
  • Integrated water resources management

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Impact of Land Use on Karst Water Resources—A Case Study of the Kupa (Kolpa) Transboundary River Catchment
Water 2020, 12(11), 3226; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12113226 - 18 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 573
Abstract
This paper presents a qualitative approach for assessing land-use pressures on the water resources of a transboundary Dinaric karst catchment of the Kupa River in Southeast Europe. Spatial analyses of the water quality indices for surface water and groundwater were carried out in [...] Read more.
This paper presents a qualitative approach for assessing land-use pressures on the water resources of a transboundary Dinaric karst catchment of the Kupa River in Southeast Europe. Spatial analyses of the water quality indices for surface water and groundwater were carried out in a GIS environment, as well as a detailed assessment of man-made hazards based on recommendations of COST Action 620. The produced maps provide an insight into the qualitative status of water resources at a regional scale by indicating areas of potential negative impacts of land use through the identification of point and diffuse sources of pollution. Higher values of the water quality indices for surface water and groundwater are observed in lowland areas, karst plateaus and poljes, where the impacts of anthropogenic activities such as agriculture and quarries take place on karstified permeable carbonate rocks. Hazard assessment showed how transport infrastructure induces a low hazard level. Settlement areas without proper sewerage systems impose moderate hazard levels, while direct wastewater discharges into groundwater and waste illegally disposed in karst swallow holes and caves located near settlements were classified as having high hazard levels. The applied methods proved to be suitable even in challenging karst environments where the complex properties and structure make the exploration and monitoring of groundwater resources difficult and scarce. Full article
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Article
Minimizing Soil Nitrogen Leaching by Changing Furrow Irrigation into Sprinkler Fertigation in Potato Fields in the Northwestern China Plain
Water 2020, 12(8), 2229; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12082229 - 07 Aug 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 727
Abstract
Irrigation water is limiting for crop production in arid areas and application rates of fertilizers often exceed crop requirements, resulting in high accumulation of nitrate nitrogen (NO3-N) in the soil. Management practices play a significant role in the leaching of [...] Read more.
Irrigation water is limiting for crop production in arid areas and application rates of fertilizers often exceed crop requirements, resulting in high accumulation of nitrate nitrogen (NO3-N) in the soil. Management practices play a significant role in the leaching of NO3-N. This experiment compares the effects of traditional furrow irrigation and sprinkler fertigation on the soil NO3-N concentration trend throughout the cropping season in potato fields in China. Two irrigation systems that were fertilized, namely by furrow (NF-FI) and sprinkler fertigation (NF-SI), and two controlling without any fertilizer (C-FI and C-SI) were tested in the same experimental site for three consecutive years. Both the NF-FI soils and NF-SI soils with three replications and fertilizer applications of 273 kg N ha−1 exhibited a different trend of NO3-N accumulation at different depths of soil profile. However, the magnitude of NO3-N accumulation was low in the NF-SI soil profile. In NF-SI treatments, higher NO3-N was observed at 20–40 cm soil layer. In the NF-FI, the concentration of the highest nitrate was observed at the 40–120 cm soil layer. The concentrations of NO3-N in the fertilized soil were higher than those of the control soil for each irrigation system. Residual levels of NO3-N in the soil depth of 40–120 cm from NF-FI were 1.54, 3.45 and 5.28 times higher than NF-SI after harvesting potatoes from 2015 to 2017. In NF-FI treatments, apparent nitrogen loss was 234.7, 237.5 and 276.7 kg ha−1 after harvesting potatoes in 2015, 2016 and 2017. Meanwhile, apparent nitrogen loss from NF-SI treatments was only 161.9, 132.1 and 148.9 kg ha−1, which was 31.0%, 44.4% and 46.2% lower than that of NF-FI in 2015, 2016 and 2017, respectively. The risk of NO3-N leaching below the root zone from NF-FI was higher than that from NF-SI. It has been demonstrated that sprinkler fertigation can also be used as a tool for mitigating NO3-N accumulation and apparent nitrogen loss. Full article
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Article
An Innovative Tool for the Management of the Surface Drinking Water Resources at European Level: GOWARE—Transnational Guide Towards an Optimal WAter REgime
Water 2020, 12(2), 370; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12020370 - 29 Jan 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1884
Abstract
GOWARE (transnational Guide toward an Optimal WAter REgime) represents a Decision Support Tool (DST) developed to support the implementation of innovative Best Management Practices (BMPs) for drinking water protection and flood/drought risk mitigation. The tool is one of the main outputs of the [...] Read more.
GOWARE (transnational Guide toward an Optimal WAter REgime) represents a Decision Support Tool (DST) developed to support the implementation of innovative Best Management Practices (BMPs) for drinking water protection and flood/drought risk mitigation. The tool is one of the main outputs of the PROLINE-CE Project, an EU project funded within the Interreg Central Europe (CE) Programme (2014–2020). The aim of this paper is illustrating the design and the methodological approaches proposed for the operative development of the tool. Furthermore, the paper provides the results of a number of tests carried out to evaluate the understandability of the analysis’s processes and assessing the stakeholders’ acceptance. Specifically, GOWARE-DST has been developed for supporting single users or groups of users in the decision-making process. The tool has been provided with a catalogue of 92 BMPs to handle water issues in different land use contexts. The selection of practices suitable for addressing the specific user’s requirements is supported by the Analytic Hierarchy Process, a method that allows filtering a subset of BMPs by accounting for the relative importance that the user assigns to each characterizing criterion. GOWARE-DST represents an innovative tool for supporting users at different levels of planning (operational and strategic) by promoting sustainable land and water management and defining long-term governance activities. Full article
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