Special Issue "Flood Risk in the Anthropocene"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Resources Management, Policy and Governance".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Luigia Brandimarte
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
The Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Department of Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Stockholm, Sweden
Interests: My research focuses on understanding the mutual interaction between fluvial processes and human activities. In particular, my main research interests are: dynamics of water and society; flood risk management; scour at hydraulic structures
Dr. Maurizio Mazzoleni
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden
Interests: My research interests include flood forecasting, data assimilation, large scale distributed hydrological modeling, remote sensing, flood risk, and uncertainty analysis and reliability analysis of flood defense systems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Casualties, economic losses, and intangible damages ascribed to floods are still dramatically increasing in different regions of the world. Societies have shown different forms of reacting to floods, fighting or adapting, and implementing structural or nonstructural protection measures, or a combination of all. Whatever the interaction between society and floods, though,it will induce alterations to the human–flood dynamic that might have implications both for humans and the natural system.

As the scale and pace of human interactions with earth systems have intensified, understanding how human-induced alterations (and their implications) have formed in the past and are developing in the present is crucial to our ability to anticipate, mitigate, and adapt to changes in the future.

This Special Issue welcomes contributions from the engineering, earth, and social sciences. Examples include the following topics:

  • Observing, modeling, and managing flood risk in a changing environment;
  • Sociohydrological dynamics in floodplains (at small and large scale);
  • Climate-stressed flood risk in low-income countries;
  • Human–flood interactions in urbanizing areas.

Dr. Luigia Brandimarte
Dr. Maurizio Mazzoleni
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Flood risk
  • Floodplains
  • Human–flood interactions
  • Sociohydrology
  • Anthropocene.

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Analysis of 220 Years of Floodplain Population Dynamics in the US at Different Spatial Scales
Water 2021, 13(2), 141; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13020141 - 09 Jan 2021
Viewed by 778
Abstract
In this study, we explore the long-term trends of floodplain population dynamics at different spatial scales in the contiguous United States (U.S.). We exploit different types of datasets from 1790–2010—i.e., decadal spatial distribution for the population density in the US, global floodplains dataset, [...] Read more.
In this study, we explore the long-term trends of floodplain population dynamics at different spatial scales in the contiguous United States (U.S.). We exploit different types of datasets from 1790–2010—i.e., decadal spatial distribution for the population density in the US, global floodplains dataset, large-scale data of flood occurrence and damage, and structural and nonstructural flood protection measures for the US. At the national level, we found that the population initially settled down within the floodplains and then spread across its territory over time. At the state level, we observed that flood damages and national protection measures might have contributed to a learning effect, which in turn, shaped the floodplain population dynamics over time. Finally, at the county level, other socio-economic factors such as local flood insurances, economic activities, and socio-political context may predominantly influence the dynamics. Our study shows that different influencing factors affect floodplain population dynamics at different spatial scales. These facts are crucial for a reliable development and implementation of flood risk management planning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Flood Risk in the Anthropocene)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
The Role of Experience and Different Sources of Knowledge in Shaping Flood Risk Awareness
Water 2020, 12(8), 2130; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12082130 - 27 Jul 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1223
Abstract
Understanding what makes people vulnerable to flooding is key in informing the risk management process. Non-structural measures, such as risk communication, can reduce vulnerability by improving flood risk awareness, but they require a deep understanding of which factors influence risk awareness, and how. [...] Read more.
Understanding what makes people vulnerable to flooding is key in informing the risk management process. Non-structural measures, such as risk communication, can reduce vulnerability by improving flood risk awareness, but they require a deep understanding of which factors influence risk awareness, and how. We analysed and untangled the role of experience with, and knowledge of, floods by conducting a survey in a municipality in North-eastern Italy that was hit by a flash flood in 2018. The results show that previous experience with floods influences risk awareness not only directly, but also indirectly through the knowledge that was gained from that experience. In addition, specific (as opposed to generic) definitions of experience have been found to be better suited for exploring their effects on risk awareness. Based on the literature and on our results, we propose an experience-knowledge typology to help unravel the complex role that these two variables play in shaping flood risk awareness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Flood Risk in the Anthropocene)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Socio-Hydrological Modelling: The Influence of Reservoir Management and Societal Responses on Flood Impacts
Water 2020, 12(5), 1384; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12051384 - 13 May 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1329
Abstract
Over the last few years, several socio-hydrological studies have investigated the risk dynamics generated by the complex interactions between floods and societies, with a focus on either changing reservoir operation rules or raising levees. In this study, we propose a new socio-hydrological model [...] Read more.
Over the last few years, several socio-hydrological studies have investigated the risk dynamics generated by the complex interactions between floods and societies, with a focus on either changing reservoir operation rules or raising levees. In this study, we propose a new socio-hydrological model of human–flood interactions that represents both changes in the reservoir management strategies and updating of the levee system. Our model is applied to simulate three prototypes of floodplain management strategies to cope with flood risk: green systems, in which societies resettle outside the flood-prone area; technological systems, in which societies implement structural measures, such as levees; and green-to-techno systems, in which societies shift from green to technological approaches. Floodplain dynamics are explored simulating possible future scenarios in the city of Brisbane, Australia. Results show that flood risk is strongly influenced by changes in flood and drought memory of reservoir operators, while risk-awareness levels shape the urbanisation of floodplains. Furthermore, scenarios of more frequent and higher magnitude events prove to enhance social flood memory in green systems, while technological systems experience much higher losses. Interestingly, green-to-techno systems may also evolve toward green floodplain management systems in response to large losses and technical/economical unfeasibility of larger structural measures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Flood Risk in the Anthropocene)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop