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Special Issue "Hydrological Impact of Typhoon on Rivers"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydrology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 August 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Jr-chuan Huang

Department of Geography, National Taiwan University
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +886-2-33665825
Interests: hydrological modelling; simulation; land sliding and sediment export; nitrogen cycling within watersheds
Guest Editor
Prof. Tsung-Yu Lee

Department of Geography, National Taiwan Normal University
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +886-2-77341667
Interests: sediment export, climate change, sustainability, watershed management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Rivers link terrestrial and marine ecosystems, not only transporting numerous substances downstream, but also shaping lanscapes and fostering aquatic ecosystems through the interactions of biogeochemical processes with numerous agents. In this regard, rainstorms are regarded as an episodic, strong trigger that accelerates riverine transport and causes sequestrial effects. Recently, global warming has accelerated water cycling via thermodynamics and thus the frequency and intensity of extreme events have been enhanced. The intensified extreme events inevitably stimulate the response of river systems through sediment and nutrient transport, as well as the associated biogeochemical processes. Those strong impacts on river systems should be comprehensively explored. This issue aims to improve the understanding of rainstorm effects in river systems. Inter- and cross-discipline studies on different watershed scales, linking ecosystem services and on watershed management are particularly welcome.

Prof. Jr-chuan Huang
Prof. Tsung-Yu Lee
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • hydrological modelling
  • extreme events
  • sediment and nutrient export
  • nutrient cycling within watersheds

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Modeling Sediment Yields and Stream Stability Due to Sediment-Related Disaster in Shihmen Reservoir Watershed in Taiwan
Water 2019, 11(2), 332; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11020332
Received: 15 January 2019 / Revised: 7 February 2019 / Accepted: 11 February 2019 / Published: 15 February 2019
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Abstract
Accurate and reliable estimates of sediment yields from a watershed and identification of unstable stream reaches due to sediment-related disaster are crucial for watershed management, disaster prevention, and hazard mitigation purposes. In this study, we added hydrodynamic and sediment transport modules in a [...] Read more.
Accurate and reliable estimates of sediment yields from a watershed and identification of unstable stream reaches due to sediment-related disaster are crucial for watershed management, disaster prevention, and hazard mitigation purposes. In this study, we added hydrodynamic and sediment transport modules in a recently developed model to estimate sediment yields and identify the unstable stream reaches in a large-scale watershed (> 100km2). The calibrated and verified models can well reproduce the flow discharge and sediment discharge at the study site, the Shihmen Reservoir Watershed in Taiwan, during several typhoon events. For the scenario applications, the results revealed that the contribution (> 96%) of landslides on sediment supply is much more significant than compared to soil erosion (< 4%). The sediment contribution from the upstream of the hydrological station-Yufeng is approximately 36–55% of the total sediment supply for the rainfall events of 25, 50, 100, and 200 years return period. It also indicates that 22–52% of sediment still remain at foot of the slope and the streams, which become a potential source for sediment hazards in the future. Combining with the bed erosion and deposition depths, flow-induced shear stress from the SRH-2D model, and probability of slope failure within 250 m of stream reaches, the relatively stability of stream reaches can be identified. The results could provide the water resource authorities for reference to take precautionary measures in advance on the stream reaches with high-degree instability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrological Impact of Typhoon on Rivers)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Topographical Analysis of the 2013 Typhoon Haiyan Storm Surge Flooding by Combining the JMA Storm Surge Model and the FLO-2D Flood Inundation Model
Water 2019, 11(1), 144; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11010144
Received: 26 November 2018 / Revised: 7 January 2019 / Accepted: 8 January 2019 / Published: 15 January 2019
PDF Full-text (8826 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The floods associated with the effects of an incoming tropical cyclone have an immense effect in the Philippines, especially with respect to agriculture, industry, livelihood, and public safety. Knowledge of how such storm surge flooding can affect the community is therefore of great [...] Read more.
The floods associated with the effects of an incoming tropical cyclone have an immense effect in the Philippines, especially with respect to agriculture, industry, livelihood, and public safety. Knowledge of how such storm surge flooding can affect the community is therefore of great importance. In this study, the mechanisms behind Typhoon Haiyan’s anomalous storm surge flooding in 2013, which resulted in more than 6300 casualties and 2.86 billion USD worth of damage in the Philippines, were investigated. The Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) storm surge model and the FLO-2D flood model were used to simulate Typhoon Haiyan’s storm surge height and the extent of inundation, respectively. The storm surge input data were obtained from JMA typhoon data, and the digital terrain models used were gathered from the airborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar data. The model’s accuracy was also validated using field validation data of the extent of the observed storm surge in affected coastal areas. Topographical analysis of the inundated regions showed the effects of coastal shape, elevation, and position relative to the typhoon’s approach angle on storm surge flow depth and velocity. Storm surge maximum velocity appears to increase as the fluid flows to an increasingly elevated area. Observing fluid velocity in a coastal area with uniform storm surge discharge from all directions also showed that flow velocity tends to increase at the center. Greater flood depths were experienced in areas with lower coastal elevation and not directly located at the coast, compared to higher elevation coastal areas. Greater extents of storm surge flooding are expected in coastal areas that have a concave shape, as fluid is more likely to be dispersed when hitting a convex coast. Extents are likewise observed to be greater in coastal regions that are located perpendicular to the direction of the typhoon. The research also validated the option of using a combination of typhoon and flood models to simulate the inundation flooding caused by extreme weather events. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrological Impact of Typhoon on Rivers)
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Graphical abstract

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