E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Riparian Vegetation in River Functioning"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydrology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Marta González Del Tánago

Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +34 913366394
Interests: riparian vegetation; fluvial geomorphology; hydromorphology; riparian systems; environmental assessment; river restoration
Guest Editor
Dr. Simon Dufour

University of Rennes, France
E-Mail
Interests: riparian vegetation; fluvial landscape; riparian systems; environmental assessment; fluvial remote sensing analysis; river management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Riparian vegetation is an essential component of river systems and controls fluvial functioning (i.e. morphodynamics, nutrient fluxes, floods, etc.). Plants within river corridors reciprocally interact with fluvial processes, for example influencing hydraulic conditions and erosion, transport and deposition of sediments. Research on vegetation and fluvial processes has increased considerably in the last decades, recognizing the role of plants as river system engineers and the importance of riparian vegetation responses to many human disturbances leading river hydromorphological trajectories and ecological status. Considerable advances in spatial analysis, fluvial remote sensing and process-based modelling offer nowadays great opportunities for gaining knowledge  on river behaviour under natural and human-induced stressors. More recently, the increasing awareness of the importance of riparian and aquatic vegetation on the provision of ecosystem services by aquatic ecosystems has simultaneously reinforced the interest on river vegetation research from multiple perspectives.

This Special Issue aims to provide an up-dated collection of articles, where scientists, researchers and experts can submit their novel results and innovative approaches  dealing with the role of vegetation in river functioning (morphodynamics, water quality, flood management, etc.), riverine landscapes, river hydromorphological assessment and river management. It intends to include studies from different disciplines, since riverine plants taxonomy to riverine plants dynamic modelling; since vegetation as an essential component of fluvial hydromorphological and ecological assessments, having a major role as biological indicator of fluvial process, quality of river physical habitat and ecosystem services, to vegetation as a key component of remote sensing and spatial and temporal analysis of the landscape, or vegetation as a crucial management tool for river restoration and conservation.

Dr. Marta González del Tánago
Dr. Simon Dufour
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Riparian vegetation
  • aquatic vegetation
  • hydromorphology
  • fluvial analysis
  • river environmental assessments
  • morphodynamic modelling
  • vegetation responses
  • riverine landscape
  • riparian ecosystem services
  • water quality
  • flood

Published Papers (3 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-3
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Changes in Vegetation and Geomorphological Condition 10 Years after Riparian Restoration
Water 2019, 11(6), 1252; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11061252
Received: 24 April 2019 / Revised: 31 May 2019 / Accepted: 12 June 2019 / Published: 14 June 2019
PDF Full-text (1970 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Riparian restoration is an important objective for landscape managers seeking to redress the widespread degradation of riparian areas and the ecosystem services they provide. This study investigated the long-term outcomes of ‘one-off’ restoration activities undertaken in the Upper Murrumbidgee Catchment, NSW, Australia. The [...] Read more.
Riparian restoration is an important objective for landscape managers seeking to redress the widespread degradation of riparian areas and the ecosystem services they provide. This study investigated the long-term outcomes of ‘one-off’ restoration activities undertaken in the Upper Murrumbidgee Catchment, NSW, Australia. The objective of the restoration was to protect and enhance riparian vegetation and control erosion, and consequently reduce sediment and nutrient delivery into the Murrumbidgee River. To evaluate the outcomes 10 years after restoration, rapid riparian vegetation and geomorphological assessments were undertaken at 29 sites spanning the four different restoration methods used (at least five replicates per treatment), as well as at nine comparable untreated sites. We also trialed the use of aerial imagery to compare width of riparian canopy vegetation and projective foliage cover prior to restoration with that observed after 10 years. Aerial imagery demonstrated the width of riparian canopy vegetation and projective foliage cover increased in all restored sites, especially those with native plantings. The rapid assessment process indicated that 10 years after riparian restoration, the riparian vegetation was in a better condition at treated sites compared to untreated sites. Width of riparian canopy vegetation, native mid-storey cover, native canopy cover and seedling recruitment were significantly greater in treated sites compared to untreated sites. Geomorphological condition of treated sites was significantly better than untreated sites, demonstrating the importance of livestock exclusion to improve bank and channel condition. Our findings illustrate the value of ‘one-off’ restoration activities in achieving long-term benefits for riparian health. We have demonstrated that rapid assessments of the vegetation and geomorphological condition can be undertaken post-hoc to determine the long-term outcomes, especially when supported with analysis of historical aerial imagery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Riparian Vegetation in River Functioning)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Mapping Riparian Vegetation Functions Using 3D Bispectral LiDAR Data
Water 2019, 11(3), 483; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11030483
Received: 11 February 2019 / Revised: 25 February 2019 / Accepted: 28 February 2019 / Published: 7 March 2019
PDF Full-text (46530 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Riparian zones experience many anthropic pressures and are the subject of European legislation to encourage their monitoring and management, to attenuate these pressures. Assessing the effectiveness of management practices requires producing indicators of ecological functions. Laser Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data can provide [...] Read more.
Riparian zones experience many anthropic pressures and are the subject of European legislation to encourage their monitoring and management, to attenuate these pressures. Assessing the effectiveness of management practices requires producing indicators of ecological functions. Laser Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data can provide valuable information to assess the ecological status of riparian zones. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of LiDAR point clouds to produce indicators of riparian zone status. We used 3D bispectral LiDAR data to produce several indicators of a riparian zone of a dammed river in Normandy (France). The indicators were produced either directly from the 3D point clouds (e.g., biomass overhanging the channel, variation in canopy height) or indirectly, by applying the Random Forest classification algorithm to the point clouds. Results highlight the potential of 3D LiDAR point clouds to produce indicators with sufficient accuracy (ca. 80% for the number of trunks and 68% for species composition). Our results also reveal advantages of using metrics related to the internal structure of trees, such as penetration indexes. However, intensity metrics calculated using bispectral properties of LiDAR did not improve the quality of classifications. Longitudinal analysis of the indicators revealed a difference in attributes between the reservoir and areas downstream from it. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Riparian Vegetation in River Functioning)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Model-Based Analysis of Macrophytes Role in the Flow Distribution in the Anastomosing River System
Water 2018, 10(7), 953; https://doi.org/10.3390/w10070953
Received: 4 June 2018 / Revised: 3 July 2018 / Accepted: 13 July 2018 / Published: 18 July 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (8600 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The impact of vegetation on the hydrology and geomorphology of aquatic ecosystems has been studied intensively in recent years. Numerous hydraulic models developed to date help to understand and quantitatively assess the influence of in-stream macrophytes on a channel’s hydraulic conditions. However, special [...] Read more.
The impact of vegetation on the hydrology and geomorphology of aquatic ecosystems has been studied intensively in recent years. Numerous hydraulic models developed to date help to understand and quantitatively assess the influence of in-stream macrophytes on a channel’s hydraulic conditions. However, special focus is placed on single-thread rivers, leaving anastomosing rivers practically uninvestigated. To fill this gap, the objective of this study was to investigate the impact of vegetation on flow distribution in a complex anastomosing river system situated in northeastern Poland. The newly designed, one-dimensional, steady-flow model, dedicated for anastomosing rivers used in this study indicated high influence of vegetation on water flow distribution during the whole year in general, but—as expected—significantly higher in the summer season. Simulations of in-stream vegetation removal in selected channels reflected in Manning’s coefficient alterations caused relatively high discharge transitions during the growing season. This proved the significance of feedback between process of plants growth and distribution of flow in anabranches. The results are unique and relevant and could be successfully considered for the protection of semi-natural anabranching rivers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Riparian Vegetation in River Functioning)
Figures

Figure 1

Water EISSN 2073-4441 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top