Special Issue "Quantifying the Effects of Global Change on the Distribution and Quality of Aquatic Resources"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 21 March 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Émilie Saulnier-Talbot
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Guest Editor
Université Laval, Québec City, QC, Canada
Interests: aquatic ecology; global change; paleolimnology; geoecology; Anthropocene
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Isabelle Lavoie
Website
Guest Editor
Institut national de la recherche scientifique, centre Eau Terre Environnement, 490 rue de la Couronne, Québec, QC G1K 9A9, Canada
Interests: biofilms; diatoms; eutrophication; contaminants; fatty acids; streams and rivers; teratologies; multi-stress
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Philippe Archambault
Website
Guest Editor
Université Laval, Québec City, QC, Canada
Interests: role of marine biodiversity in polar and temperate seas; biodiversity and ecosystem functioning; ecological disturbance; ecosystem health indicators related to anthropogenic and natural disturbances

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Now more than ever, a better understanding of the multifarious effects of Global Change on the state of aquatic resources is necessary in order to manage them sustainably. Considerable efforts have been invested into research with the aim of quantifying the effects of the multiple components of Global Change on the quality and distribution of aquatic resources and on the health of aquatic ecosystems. As such, the time is ripe for a Special Issue of Water, an open access journal that facilitates rapid access to quality research for all, focusing on research aimed at Quantifying the Effects of Global Change on the Distribution and Quality of Aquatic Resources. This topic includes studies on continental fresh waters (rivers, lakes, wetlands, groundwater) as well as coastal and marine environments. Articles that address the diverse aspects of aquatic resources and ecosystem research will be considered, including on the topics of modeling, biodiversity assessment, climate, pollution, urbanization, maritime activities, depletion of aquatic resources, ecosystem services, water-related conflicts, and advancements in aquatic resource sustainability.

Several types of articles can be submitted for consideration, including those presenting original research as well as reviews, opinions, concept papers, and essays on any topic related to the theme of the Special Issue.

We look forward to receiving your submissions before 1 March 2021.

Dr. Émilie Saulnier-Talbot
Dr. Isabelle Lavoie
Dr. Philippe Archambault
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Water quality
  • Biodiversity
  • Eutrophication
  • Invasive species
  • Ecosystem services
  • Environmental change
  • Salinization
  • fisheries
  • Water availability
  • Climate impacts

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessEditor’s ChoiceArticle
Biodiversity and Habitat Assessment of Coastal Benthic Communities in a Sub-Arctic Industrial Harbor Area
Water 2020, 12(9), 2424; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12092424 - 28 Aug 2020
Abstract
Coastal ecosystems face increasing anthropogenic pressures worldwide and their management requires a solid assessment and understanding of the cumulative impacts from human activities. This study evaluates the spatial variation of benthic macrofaunal communities, sediments, and heavy metals in the sub-Arctic coastal ecosystems around [...] Read more.
Coastal ecosystems face increasing anthropogenic pressures worldwide and their management requires a solid assessment and understanding of the cumulative impacts from human activities. This study evaluates the spatial variation of benthic macrofaunal communities, sediments, and heavy metals in the sub-Arctic coastal ecosystems around Sept-Îles (Québec, Canada)—a major port area in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Physical sediment properties varied in the studied area, with a general sandy-silty profile except for specific locations in Baie des Sept Îles where higher organic matter and heavy metal concentrations were detected. Macrofaunal assemblages were evaluated for two taxa size classes (organisms > 0.5 mm and > 1 mm) and linked to habitat parameters using regression models. Communities of smaller organisms showed signs of perturbation for one assemblage close to industrial activities at Baie des Sept Îles, with an increased number of tolerant and opportunistic species, contrasting to neighboring regions whose compositions were similar to other ecosystems in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. This study enhances the understanding of sub-Arctic benthic communities and will contribute to monitoring programs for industrial harbor ecosystems. Full article
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