Special Issue "New Theoretical and Applied Advances in Paleolimnology"

A special issue of Geosciences (ISSN 2076-3263).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2018).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Émilie Saulnier-Talbot
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre d’Études Nordiques, Université Laval, Canada
Interests: anthropocene; biodiversity; climate; freshwater ecology; global change; paleolimnology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the past few years, there have been significant advances made in the development and application of new approaches in paleolimnology. Our toolbox for exploring lacustrine archives is growing at a rapid pace and it now seems timely to dedicate a Special Issue focusing on these advances to make them more widely known within our research community and to the scientific public at large. The scope and diversity of these advances are vast, ranging from the development of various molecular techniques applied to the study of lake sediment contents, to novel numerical approaches used to analyze paleolimnological data, to improved equipment for sampling lake sediments. The purpose of this special issue is therefore to provide an open-access platform specifically dedicated to presenting a coherent collection of examples of the various recent advances in paleolimnology. Additionally, manuscripts presenting paleolimnological research conducted on lake-types that have seldom been investigated through this approach (e.g., human-made reservoirs, pluvial lakes, peatlands), or on lakes located in regions where paleolimnological studies are rare or lacking are also welcome. Several article types can be submitted, including those presenting original research, as well as review, opinion, concept and essay papers on any topic related to the theme of the Special Issue.

It is recommended that authors approach the Guest Editor at an early stage about possible submissions to verify the appropriateness of their potential contributions. If appropriate, an abstract will be requested, and the corresponding author will be required to submit the full manuscript online by the deadline of 30 April 2018.

Dr. Émilie Saulnier-Talbot
Guest Editor

 

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Geosciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sediments
  • lakes
  • environmental reconstruction
  • biogeochemical indicators
  • numerical analyses
  • inference
  • hindcasting

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Potential Indicator Value of Subfossil Gastropods in Assessing the Ecological Health of the Middle and Lower Reaches of the Yangtze River Floodplain System (China)
Geosciences 2018, 8(6), 222; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences8060222 - 17 Jun 2018
Abstract
The lakes across China’s middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River system have a long history of sustaining human pressures. These aquatic resources have been exploited for fisheries and irrigation over millennia at a magnitude of scales, with the result that many [...] Read more.
The lakes across China’s middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River system have a long history of sustaining human pressures. These aquatic resources have been exploited for fisheries and irrigation over millennia at a magnitude of scales, with the result that many lakes have lost their ecological integrity. The consequences of these changes in the ecosystem health of lakes are not fully understood; therefore, a long-term investigation is urgently needed. Gastropods (aquatic snails) are powerful bio-indicators that link primary producers, herbivores, and detritivores associated with macrophytes and grazers of periphyton and higher-level consumers. They are sensitive to abrupt environmental change such as eutrophication, dehydration, flooding, and proliferation of toxicity in floodplain lake systems. The use of the remains of gastropod shells (subfossils) preserved in the sedimentary archives of the floodplain lakes of the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River system holds high significance, as their potential in environmental change has not been studied in detail in the past. Here, we aim to test the hypothesis that modern and sub-fossil gastropods in the sediments of the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River floodplains systems have significant value as bioindicators, as they have the ability to reveal health-gradients of lake-ecosystem change in the region. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Theoretical and Applied Advances in Paleolimnology)
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Open AccessArticle
Low Cost, Lightweight Gravity Coring and Improved Epoxy Impregnation Applied to Laminated Maar Sediment in Vietnam
Geosciences 2018, 8(5), 176; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences8050176 - 11 May 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
In response to the need for lightweight and affordable sediment coring and high-resolution structural documentation of unconsolidated sediment, we developed economical and fast methods for (i) recovering short sediment cores with undisturbed topmost sediment, without the need for a firmly anchored coring platform, [...] Read more.
In response to the need for lightweight and affordable sediment coring and high-resolution structural documentation of unconsolidated sediment, we developed economical and fast methods for (i) recovering short sediment cores with undisturbed topmost sediment, without the need for a firmly anchored coring platform, and (ii) rapid epoxy-impregnation of crayon-shaped subcores in preparation for thin-sectioning, with minimal use of solvents and epoxy resin. The ‘Autonomous Gravity Corer’ (AGC) can be carried to remote locations and deployed from an inflatable or makeshift raft. Its utility was tested on modern unconsolidated lacustrine sediment from a ~21 m deep maar lake in Vietnam’s Central Highlands near Pleiku. The sedimentary fabric fidelity of the epoxy-impregnation method was demonstrated for finely laminated artificial flume sediment. Our affordable AGC is attractive not only for work in developing countries, but lends itself broadly for coring in remote regions where challenging logistics prevent the use of heavy coring equipment. The improved epoxy-impregnation technique saves effort and costly chemical reagents, while at the same time preserving the texture of the sediment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Theoretical and Applied Advances in Paleolimnology)
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Open AccessArticle
Possible Sediment Mixing and the Disparity between Field Measurements and Paleolimnological Inferences in Shallow Iowa Lakes in the Midwestern United States
Geosciences 2018, 8(2), 40; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences8020040 - 24 Jan 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
Field measurements of water quality in Iowa lakes contradict paleolimnological studies that used 210Pb dating techniques in 33 lakes to infer accelerating eutrophication and sediment accumulation in recent decades. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing a series of water quality measurements taken [...] Read more.
Field measurements of water quality in Iowa lakes contradict paleolimnological studies that used 210Pb dating techniques in 33 lakes to infer accelerating eutrophication and sediment accumulation in recent decades. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing a series of water quality measurements taken in 24 of these lakes during the period 1972–2010. There was little change in the trophic state variables. Total phosphorus and algal chlorophylls did not increase, and Secchi depths did not decrease with no evidence that the lakes had become more eutrophic. Changes in daily sediment loads in the Raccoon River also did not match the paleolimnological inferred rates of soil erosion for the period 1905–2005, and an independent estimate of soil erosion rates showed a decline of 40% in the 1977 to 2012 period rather than an increase. We hypothesized that sediment mixing by benthivorous fish could be responsible for violating the basic assumption of 210Pb sediment dating that the sediments are not disturbed once they are laid down. We developed a mathematical model that demonstrated that sediment mixing could lead to false inferences about sediment dates and sediment burial rates. This study raises the possibility that sediment mixing in Iowa lakes and similar shallow, eutrophic lakes with benthivorous fish may cause significant sediment mixing that can compromise dating using 210Pb dating of sediment cores. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Theoretical and Applied Advances in Paleolimnology)
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