Coastal Management and Nearshore Hydrodynamics

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Oceans and Coastal Zones".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 May 2024) | Viewed by 3400

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Ocean College, Zhejiang University, Zhoushan, China
Interests: numerical simulation theory; technique and application of coupled dynamics between water mass transport and geogenesis

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Ocean College, Zhejiang University, Zhoushan, China
Interests: bragg resonance of water waves; coastal engineering; hydraulic engineering; wave hydrodynamics; boussinesq wave model; fringing reefs; infra-gravity waves; wave runup

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Coastal management focuses on the preservation and sustainable use of coastal resources, addressing the challenges posed by natural processes, human activities, and climate change. It involves a multidisciplinary approach that combines scientific knowledge, policy making, and stakeholder engagement. On the other hand, nearshore hydrodynamics is concerned with the study of water movement and its interactions with the nearshore zone, which extends from the shoreline to the offshore region. In the context of global climate change, significant changes in nearshore hydrodynamic processes may occur and impact coastal ecosystems and human activities. A comprehensive understanding of nearshore hydrodynamics is essential for the development of sustainable coastal management plans.

Therefore, this Special Issue entitled ‘Coastal Management and Nearshore Hydrodynamics’ offers a comprehensive exploration of the interplay between coastal management and nearshore hydrodynamics by addressing key themes such as climate change, coastal hazards, infrastructure management, and policy making. The findings and recommendations presented in this Special Issue will contribute to the ongoing efforts to protect and preserve coastal areas worldwide, ensuring their long-term viability in the face of dynamic environmental challenges.

Prof. Dr. Peng Hu
Dr. Weijie Liu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • coastal management
  • nearshore hydrodynamics
  • climate change
  • coastal hazards
  • waves and current
  • policy and planning

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

23 pages, 13719 KiB  
Article
Numerical Study on the Formation Mechanism of Plume Bulge in the Pearl River Estuary under the Influence of River Discharge
by Chenyu Zhao, Nan Wang, Yang Ding, Dehai Song, Junmin Li, Mengqi Li, Lingling Zhou, Hang Yu, Yanyu Chen and Xianwen Bao
Water 2024, 16(9), 1296; https://doi.org/10.3390/w16091296 - 2 May 2024
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Abstract
Previous studies have investigated the characteristics and influencing factors of plume bulge in the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) using observations and numerical simulations. However, the understanding of how river discharge affects plume bulge is not consistent, and the response mechanism of plume bulge [...] Read more.
Previous studies have investigated the characteristics and influencing factors of plume bulge in the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) using observations and numerical simulations. However, the understanding of how river discharge affects plume bulge is not consistent, and the response mechanism of plume bulge to changes in river discharge has not been revealed in detail. In this study, a three-dimensional hydrodynamic Finite-Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) is constructed, and five experiments were set to characterize the horizontal and vertical distribution of the plume bulge outside the PRE under different river discharge conditions during spring tide. The physical mechanisms of plume bulge generation and its response mechanisms to river discharge were discussed through standardized analysis and momentum diagnostic analysis. The results indicate that the plume bulge is sensitive to changes in river discharge. When the river discharge is relatively low (e.g., less than 11,720 m3/s observed in the dry season), the bulge cannot be formed. Conversely, when the river discharge is relatively high (e.g., exceeding 23,440 m3/s observed in flood season), the bulge is more significant. The plume bulge is formed by the anticyclonic flow resulting from the action of the Coriolis force on the strongly mixed river plume. The bulge remains stable under the combined effects of barotropic force, baroclinic gradient force, and Coriolis force. The reduction of river discharge weakens the mixing of freshwater and seawater, resulting in the reduction of both the volume and momentum of the river plume, and the balance between advective diffusion and Coriolis forces are altered, resulting in the plume, which is originally flushed out from the Lantau Channel, not being able to maintain the anticyclonic structure and instead floating out along the coast of the western side of the PRE, with the disappearance of the plume bulge. Due to the significant influence of plume bulges on the physical and biogeochemical interactions between estuaries and terrestrial environments, studying the physical mechanisms behind the formation of plume bulges is crucial. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Management and Nearshore Hydrodynamics)
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25 pages, 924 KiB  
Article
The Three-Dimensional Wave-Induced Current Field: An Analytical Model
by Gabriela Gic-Grusza
Water 2024, 16(8), 1165; https://doi.org/10.3390/w16081165 - 19 Apr 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 575
Abstract
Wave-induced currents play a critical role in coastal dynamics, influencing sediment transport and shaping bottom topography. Traditionally, long- and cross-shore currents in coastal zones were analyzed independently, often with two-dimensional models for longshore currents and undertow being used. The introduction of quasi-three-dimensional models [...] Read more.
Wave-induced currents play a critical role in coastal dynamics, influencing sediment transport and shaping bottom topography. Traditionally, long- and cross-shore currents in coastal zones were analyzed independently, often with two-dimensional models for longshore currents and undertow being used. The introduction of quasi-three-dimensional models marked a significant advancement toward a more holistic understanding. Despite recent proposals for fully three-dimensional models, none have achieved widespread acceptance, primarily due to challenges in accurately capturing depth-dependent radiation stress. This paper presents an innovative analytical model advocating for comprehensive three-dimensional approaches in coastal hydrodynamics. The model, based on novel simplification rules, refines relationships governing turbulent stress tensors and provides valuable insights into wave-induced stresses. It offers analytical solutions for both homogeneous and general coastal zones, laying the foundation for future advancements in numerical modeling techniques. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Management and Nearshore Hydrodynamics)
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24 pages, 9863 KiB  
Article
Larval Dispersal Modelling of the Blue Swimming Crab Portunus pelagicus (Linnaeus, 1758) from the Crab Banks along the Coast of Trang Province, Southern Thailand
by Nikom Onsri, Itchika Sivaipram, Phurich Boonsanit, Kattinat Sagulsawasdipan and Suriyan Saramul
Water 2024, 16(2), 349; https://doi.org/10.3390/w16020349 - 20 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1835
Abstract
In Thailand, the populations of a commercially important crab Portunus pelagicus (Linnaeus, 1758) have been decreasing due to overfishing, raising concerns about the conservation efforts of this crab species. The Crab Bank Project has recently been established to restore crab populations by releasing [...] Read more.
In Thailand, the populations of a commercially important crab Portunus pelagicus (Linnaeus, 1758) have been decreasing due to overfishing, raising concerns about the conservation efforts of this crab species. The Crab Bank Project has recently been established to restore crab populations by releasing crab larvae from each crab bank station. However, the fate of crab larvae after the release is poorly understood. Here, we assessed the dispersal and settlement patterns of the larvae P. pelagicus released from crab banks along the coast of Trang Province, Southern Thailand. The Lagrangian particle tracking model was employed to simulate the larval dispersal and settlement patterns after release from the crab banks during the inter-monsoon, southwest monsoon, and northeast monsoon. Our simulation revealed that virtual larvae were predominantly retained within inshore areas after the release for 14 days, regulated by tidal-driven currents, wind-induced currents, and local coastal topography. Monsoon periods affected the larval dispersal, with some larvae being transported into estuaries due to the SW monsoonal effects. After the 14-day release period, our modelled simulations suggested that the crab larvae arrived at numerous seagrass meadows along the coast, indicating potential settlement and growth. This result highlights the connectivity of sources and sinks for crab larvae after release from crab banks. Moreover, significant implications for conservation efforts and the fishery management of P. pelagicus were also discussed based on our modelled simulations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Management and Nearshore Hydrodynamics)
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