Special Issue "Ecology and Paleoecological Research on Lake and Peat Bog Ecosystems"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Biodiversity and Functionality of Aquatic Ecosystems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (12 June 2021) | Viewed by 3713

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Michał Słowiński
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Past Landscape Dynamics Laboratory, Institute of Geography and Spatial Organization, Polish Academy of Sciences
Interests: My current research uses paleoecological proxies to examine lead and lag ecosystem responses to sudden climate changes during the last glacial cycle. In my work, I use ecological and paleoecological approaches to assess how extreme events affect lake and wetland ecosystems. I try to determine the resistance and threshold values of these ecosystems and how climate change, human activities, and extreme events (i.e. drought, tornado, and flood) affect such ecosystems now and in the past.
Dr. Natalia Rudaya
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
PaleoData Lab, Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography SB RAS, Novosibirsk, Russia
Interests: My scientific interests are in the field of Quaternary Paleoecology. Objects of study include lake deposits, peatlands and archaeological sites. Using a combination of biological and geochemical methods, my colleagues and I reconstruct the environments, biodiversity and climate of past epochs. The focus is also on the interaction between people and nature in the past.
Dr. Mateusz Płóciennik
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Invertebrate Zoology and Hydrobiology, University of Łódź, Poland
Interests: As climate is the leading driver of ecosystem functioning in temperate regions, I follow response of biotic proxies to temperature fluctuations from the Late Glacial to the Meghalayan. Wetland communities depend on habitat heterogeneity and type of water supply, which is why I try to track ecosystem responses to mire humidity with robust statistical techniques. I am involved in multiproxy archaeological research that determines anthropogenic influence exerted on the state of freshwater ecology, as human-induced pressures have also influenced natural ecosystem drivers, especially since the Neolithic age

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Lake and peatland hydrological cycles play a crucial role in local and regional ecosystems and are an important element of landscape evolution in the Late Quaternary. Biogenic sediment archive (peat and lake sediments) can yield high-resolution palaeoecological records which can provide a long-term perspective for current ecological change. Human-induced pressures, combined with climate changes, have significantly alternated lake and peatland ecosystems in many parts of the world. The Anthropocene is flawed due to prolonged droughts, shrinking and degradation of wetlands, lake eutrophication and intoxication, water resource shortages, and general declining of ecosystem health and biodiversity. We hope there is common agreement in the scientific community that the recently observed climate change affects hydrological, ecological, and socioeconomic regimes. An understanding of ecosystem functioning, legacy, and long-term trajectories is crucial to protect ecosystems now and in the future. We still need research on the functioning of peatlands and freshwaters in the past and their relationships with neighboring landscapes. This will become a priority in the 21st century as climate change accelerates.

The purpose of this Water Special Issue is to gather studies on the past and current effects of climate change and human activity on (a) development pathways of peatlands and lakes, (b) sensitivity and resilience of freshwater ecosystems to extreme events (droughts, fires, floods, etc.), (c) long-term paludification, (d) water intoxication and eutrophication, (e) biodiversity, and (f) the ecohydrological response. The Water journal aims to highlight the challenges of aquatic ecosystem management and restoration from the long-term perspective of natural existence recorded in palaeoarchives. Studies on freshwaters and wetlands will indicate directions for their protection in the context of current problems related to biodiversity loss and greenhouse gas emissions.

We would like this Special Issue to integrate palaeoecological and ecohydrological studies for a better understanding of freshwaters and peatlands. Finally, we are keen to display the advancement and challenges in lake and peat bog monitoring, including data management or numerical modeling. We welcome manuscripts related to ecology and paleoecology, climate reconstruction, human impact, and environmental monitoring.

Dr. Michał Słowiński
Dr. Natalia Rudaya
Dr. Mateusz Płóciennik
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Reconstructions of environmental change
  • Monitoring and process studies
  • Paleoecology of peatland and lake ecosystems
  • Human impact
  • Paleoclimatology
  • Hydroclimatic conditions
  • Multiproxy analysis
  • Development pathways
  • Community ecology
  • Late Quaternary

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Middle Holocene Climate Oscillations Recorded in the Western Dvina Lakeland
Water 2021, 13(11), 1611; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13111611 - 07 Jun 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1747
Abstract
Although extensive archeological research works have been conducted in the Serteya region in recent years, the Holocene climate history in the Western Dvina Lakeland in Western Russia is still poorly understood. The Neolithic human occupation of the Serteyka lake–river system responded to climate [...] Read more.
Although extensive archeological research works have been conducted in the Serteya region in recent years, the Holocene climate history in the Western Dvina Lakeland in Western Russia is still poorly understood. The Neolithic human occupation of the Serteyka lake–river system responded to climate oscillations, resulting in the development of a pile-dwelling settlement between 5.9 and 4.2 ka cal BP. In this paper, we present the quantitative paleoclimatic reconstructions of the Northgrippian stage (8.2–4.2 ka cal BP) from the Great Serteya Palaeolake Basin. The reconstructions were created based on a multiproxy (Chironomidae, pollen and Cladocera) approach. The mean July air temperature remained at 17–20 °C, which is similar to the present temperature in the Smolensk Upland. The summer temperature revealed only weak oscillations during 5.9 and 4.2 ka cal BP. A more remarkable feature during those events was an increase in continentality, manifested by a lower winter temperature and lower annual precipitation. During the third, intermediate oscillation in 5.0–4.7 ka cal BP, a rise in summer temperature and stronger shifts in continental air masses were recorded. It is still unclear if the above-described climate fluctuations are linked to the North Atlantic Oscillation and can be interpreted as an indication of Bond events because only a few high-resolution paleoclimatic reconstructions from the region have been presented and these reconstructions do not demonstrate explicit oscillations in the period of 5.9 and 4.2 ka cal BP. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecology and Paleoecological Research on Lake and Peat Bog Ecosystems)
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Article
Late Holocene Peatland Evolution in Terelj and Tuul Rivers Drainage Basins in the Khentii Mountain Range of Northeastern Mongolia
Water 2021, 13(4), 562; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13040562 - 23 Feb 2021
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Abstract
This study reviews the late Holocene peatlands in Terelj River and Tuul River drainage basins in the Khentii (Khentii has been misspelled as Khentey (or Hentey) and Khentei (or Hentei) in many publications. The Khentii is the right English translation from Mongolian [...] Read more.
This study reviews the late Holocene peatlands in Terelj River and Tuul River drainage basins in the Khentii (Khentii has been misspelled as Khentey (or Hentey) and Khentei (or Hentei) in many publications. The Khentii is the right English translation from Mongolian Xэнmuй) Mountain Range of northeastern Mongolia. The peatlands were examined through their physical and chemical properties, diatom assemblages, and radiocarbon dating. In the Terelj River basin, the high contents of organic matter and biogenic silica and the dominant benthic diatom assemblages such as Eunotia praerupta, Pinnularia borealis, and Navicula mutica in the peat deposits indicate the warm and humid climates in the late Holocene. The high accretion rate of 0.97 mm/yr in the peatland records the intensive erosion in the surrounding landscape and deposition in the peatland due to increased precipitation and runoff in the humid climate since 0.5 cal. ka BP. In the Tuul River basin, the high content of mineral fractions and diatom assemblages dominated by benthic species Cymbella proxima, Encyonema silesiacum, and planktonic species Cyclotella ocellata in the peat deposits show a transition from humid to arid climates at 0.9 cal. ka BP. The accretion rate of 0.56 mm/yr in the peatland on the paleo-floodplain indicates strengthened erosion in the peatland over the past ~1000 years. This study in the southern Khentii Mountain Range provides new descriptive insights to extend the underestimated Mongolia’s peat studies, and it would be a useful proof-of-concept study for future detailed paleo-environmental analyses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecology and Paleoecological Research on Lake and Peat Bog Ecosystems)
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