New Insights in Catalytic Oxidation Processes for Water Treatment

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Wastewater Treatment and Reuse".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 March 2024 | Viewed by 3330

Special Issue Editors

College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing 100083, China
Interests: advanced oxidation; water treatment; water reuse; nanotechnology; catalytic ozonation; membrane catalysis; photocatalysis; persulfate-based process
Dr. Yang Guo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Environment and Resource, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006, China
Interests: advanced oxidation processes; catalytic ozonation; membrane catalysis; chemical kinetic modelling; emerging contaminants
Dr. Yinqiao Zhang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Engineering, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, China
Interests: water treatment; advanced oxidation process; electrochemistry; emerging contaminant; reactive species; non-radical process
Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, College of Chemical Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029, China
Interests: water treatment; catalysts synthesis, advanced oxidation process; emerging contaminant; interface reaction
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing 100107, China
Interests: water treatment; catalytic ceramic membrane; nanofiltration; membrane fouling; photocatalysis; dissolved organic matters; pharmaceutically active compounds
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Catalytic oxidation processes have been considered as promising for water and wastewater treatment. During the catalytic oxidation processes, highly reactive radicals such as hydroxyl, sulfate, chlorine, and nitrogen radicals are generated to oxidize a broad range of refractory organics (emerging contaminants and certain inorganic pollutants, etc) or to increase biodegradability as a pre-treatment prior to an ensuing biological treatment. However, how to produce and utilize reactive radicals effectively and stably are very crucial to catalytic oxidation processes. The practical application of catalytic oxidation processes is challenged by the reaction rates, harmful byproducts, scaling-up, etc. This Special Issue will focus on the kinetic studying, mechanistic understanding, and large-scale applications of catalytic oxidation processes for water and wastewater treatment, including ozone-, UV-, H2O2-, Cl2-, persulfate-, membrane-based catalytic oxidation; electrocatalytic catalytic oxidation; and photocatalytic catalytic oxidation processes. Research articles, reviews, and short communications on relevant topics are welcomed.

Prof. Dr. Fei Qi
Dr. Yang Guo
Dr. Yinqiao Zhang
Dr. Shangyi Li
Dr. Chen Li
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • catalytic oxidation processes
  • ozone
  • ultraviolet
  • hydrogen peroxide
  • chlorine
  • persulfate
  • catalytic membrane
  • photocatalysis
  • water treatment

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

24 pages, 7363 KiB  
Article
Multi-Heteroatom Doped Fe@CN Activation Peroxomonosulfate for the Removal of Trace Organic Contaminants from Water: Optimizing Fabrication and Performance
Water 2023, 15(24), 4241; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15244241 - 11 Dec 2023
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Abstract
Modification of catalysts by multi-heteroatom doping (S, P, B) is an effective way to improve the peroxomonosulfate activation performance of catalysts. In recent years, highly toxic and persistent trace organic contaminants have been frequently detected in water. Consequently, we proposed the advanced oxidation [...] Read more.
Modification of catalysts by multi-heteroatom doping (S, P, B) is an effective way to improve the peroxomonosulfate activation performance of catalysts. In recent years, highly toxic and persistent trace organic contaminants have been frequently detected in water. Consequently, we proposed the advanced oxidation processes of peroxomonosulfate activated by multi-heteroatom doped Fe@CN (X-Fe@CN) to eliminate trace organic contaminants. The physical phases of X-Fe@CN and its precursors were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. In evaluating the catalytic properties and iron ion leaching of X-Fe@CN-activated PMS for the removal of dicamba and atenolol, B-Fe@CN and PB-Fe@CN were selected and optimized. The active sites of the catalysts were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman. The pathways of PMS activation by B-Fe@CN and PB-Fe@CN were identified in combination with electron paramagnetic resonance and electrochemical experiments. Defects, O-B-O and pyrrolic nitrogen on the surface of B-Fe@CN could adsorb and activate PMS to produce SO4•−, ·OH and 1O2. Further doping with P enhanced the electron transfer on the catalyst surface, thus accelerating the activation of peroxomonosulfate. This study compared the effects of multi-heteroatom modifications and further demonstrated the synergistic effect between P and B, which can provide a theoretical basis for the selection of multi-heteroatom doped catalysts in water treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights in Catalytic Oxidation Processes for Water Treatment)
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19 pages, 1627 KiB  
Article
River Ecosystem Health Assessment in Rapid Urbanization Regions (Shenzhen, China) under the Guidance of Bioremediation Objectives
Water 2023, 15(21), 3859; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15213859 - 06 Nov 2023
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Abstract
As a coastal city with rapid urbanization and high-intensity human activities, Shenzhen, China has carried out a series of comprehensive treatments for water pollution control and ecological restoration in recent years. However, the restoration effect is mainly reflected in the improvement of water [...] Read more.
As a coastal city with rapid urbanization and high-intensity human activities, Shenzhen, China has carried out a series of comprehensive treatments for water pollution control and ecological restoration in recent years. However, the restoration effect is mainly reflected in the improvement of water quality and riparian landscape, and there is still a big gap in reaching the river’s ecological restoration goals. Therefore, it is necessary to make a full investigation and evaluation of river aquatic systems that focuses on the restoration of aquatic communities and ecosystem health. We surveyed forty-seven sampling sites in nine basins to investigate water quality and aquatic organisms (algae and macroinvertebrates) during the low-water period in 2019. Under the guidance of the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD), the urban river ecosystem health assessment system, with a total of twenty indicators from six criteria layers, was established. We addressed the bioremediation objectives in this system and aquatic organism indicators as high-weight characteristic indicators. The results showed that the degradation of the river ecosystem in Shenzhen is serious, which is mainly reflected in the simple structure of the aquatic biological community and the low biodiversity. Only one “healthy” sample site, accounting for 2% of the total sampling sites; six sites of “sub-health” level, accounting for 13%; twenty-four “poor” sample points, accounting for 51%; sixteen “extremely poor” sample points, accounting for 34%. From the perspective of spatial distribution, the river ecological status of Daya Bay Basin and Dapeng Bay Basin is good, which is at the level of “health” to “sub-health”; the Guanlan River Basin, Maozhou River Basin, Shenzhen River Basin, Shenzhen Bay Basin, Pingshan River Basin, and most of the Longgang River Basin are of “poor to extremely poor” grade; the Pearl Estuary basin is of “extremely poor” grade. This assessment system can be used as an effective tool to monitor the ecological health status, especially the enhancement of biodiversity and ecosystem function of rivers. Moreover, it could provide important decision-making guidance for river management affected by high-intensity human activities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights in Catalytic Oxidation Processes for Water Treatment)
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15 pages, 4342 KiB  
Article
Modeling BTEX Multiphase Partitioning with Soil Vapor Extraction under Groundwater Table Fluctuation Using the TMVOC Model
Water 2023, 15(13), 2477; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15132477 - 06 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1179
Abstract
The effects of groundwater table fluctuation (GTF) on the remediation of a petrochemically polluted riverside using soil vapor extraction (SVE) were investigated. The migration and transformation of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and o-xylene (BTEX) in cases of natural attenuation, SVE without GTF, and SVE [...] Read more.
The effects of groundwater table fluctuation (GTF) on the remediation of a petrochemically polluted riverside using soil vapor extraction (SVE) were investigated. The migration and transformation of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and o-xylene (BTEX) in cases of natural attenuation, SVE without GTF, and SVE with GTF were simulated using the TMVOC model. The results showed that the optimized extraction well pressure and influencing radius of the target site were 0.90 atm and 8 m, respectively. The removal rates of BTEX in cases of natural attenuation, SVE without GTF, and SVE with GTF were 11.49%, 85.16%, and 97.33%, respectively. The removal rate of BTEX was maximized in the case of SVE with a GTF amplitude of 0.5 m to 1 m. The removal rates of benzene (99.99%), toluene (99.74%), ethylbenzene (96.37%), and o-xylene (94.72%) were maximized in the case of SVE with GTF. For the cases of SVE without GTF and SVE with GTF, mass losses of BTEX in gaseous (0.05 kg, 0.05 kg, respectively) and aqueous phases (5.46 kg, 5.87 kg, respectively) were consistent. However, the mass loss of BTEX in the non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) phase in the case of SVE with GTF (155.13 kg) exceeded that in the case of SVE without GTF (135.41 kg). This is because GTF positively affected both the solubility and volatility of BTEX in the NAPL phase. With the groundwater table decreasing, flows of gas and gaseous pollutants increased by 25% along the vertical section. At this stage, the removal rates of volatile organic compounds can be further improved by increasing the flow of the extraction well. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights in Catalytic Oxidation Processes for Water Treatment)
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