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Special Issue "Viruses and Cellular Metabolism"

A special issue of Viruses (ISSN 1999-4915).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Rushika Perera

Arthropod-borne & Infectious Diseases Laboratory, Dept. of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology, Colorado State University, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: arboviral replication; cellular metabolism

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Viruses are obligate pathogens; they therefore hijack host resources to complete their life cycle. Specifically, during infection of their hosts, viruses redirect normal cellular communication pathways such that attention is focused on efficient viral replication and virion biogenesis. The key effectors of cellular communication are metabolites that are intermediates or end products of biochemical reactions. Therefore, during infection, many viruses either stimulate or suppress several biochemical pathways such that metabolic intermediates and products solely support the success of the viral life cycle. In these events, select metabolic biosignatures of infection are also produced that could aid in the diagnoses of early disease manifestations.

The goal of this Special Issue on ‘Viruses and Cellular Metabolism’ is to highlight recent advances in our understanding of how viruses hijack cellular metabolic pathways for their benefit and how the host might metabolically counteract these processes. Invited are structural and functional studies that interrogate specific virus–host interactions that drive alterations in intracellular membrane organization and vesicular traffic, immunometabolism, central carbon, amino acid, and nucleotide and lipid metabolism. Studies on defining unique metabolic biosignatures for early triaging, treatment, and management of viral diseases are also invited.

Through this Special Issue, we hope to provide a current and comprehensive understanding of the role of metabolism in viral diseases, highlight emerging technologies and approaches important for studying disease-focused metabolism, understand how knowledge gained through these studies can be translated into antiviral interventions, and create a platform for the formulation of new hypotheses and collaborations.

Dr. Rushika Perera
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Viruses is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview Role of Host Cell Secretory Machinery in Zika Virus Life Cycle
Viruses 2018, 10(10), 559; https://doi.org/10.3390/v10100559
Received: 26 September 2018 / Revised: 11 October 2018 / Accepted: 12 October 2018 / Published: 15 October 2018
PDF Full-text (1182 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The high human cost of Zika virus infections and the rapid establishment of virus circulation in novel areas, including the United States, present an urgent need for countermeasures against this emerging threat. The development of an effective vaccine against Zika virus may be
[...] Read more.
The high human cost of Zika virus infections and the rapid establishment of virus circulation in novel areas, including the United States, present an urgent need for countermeasures against this emerging threat. The development of an effective vaccine against Zika virus may be problematic because of the cross reactivity of the antibodies with other flaviviruses leading to antibody-dependent enhancement of infection. Moreover, rapidly replicating positive strand RNA viruses, including Zika virus, generate large spectrum of mutant genomes (quasi species) every replication round, allowing rapid selection of variants resistant to drugs targeting virus-specific proteins. On the other hand, viruses are ultimate cellular parasites and rely on the host metabolism for every step of their life cycle, thus presenting an opportunity to manipulate host processes as an alternative approach to suppress virus replication and spread. Zika and other flaviviruses critically depend on the cellular secretory pathway, which transfers proteins and membranes from the ER through the Golgi to the plasma membrane, for virion assembly, maturation and release. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of interactions of Zika and similar arthropod-borne flaviviruses with the cellular secretory machinery with a special emphasis on virus-specific changes of the secretory pathway. Identification of the regulatory networks and effector proteins required to accommodate the trafficking of virions, which represent a highly unusual cargo for the secretory pathway, may open an attractive and virtually untapped reservoir of alternative targets for the development of superior anti-viral drugs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Viruses and Cellular Metabolism)
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Open AccessReview A Systems Approach to Study Immuno- and Neuro-Modulatory Properties of Antiviral Agents
Viruses 2018, 10(8), 423; https://doi.org/10.3390/v10080423
Received: 26 July 2018 / Revised: 10 August 2018 / Accepted: 11 August 2018 / Published: 12 August 2018
PDF Full-text (4832 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
There are dozens of approved, investigational and experimental antiviral agents. Many of these agents cause serious side effects, which can only be revealed after drug administration. Identification of the side effects prior to drug administration is challenging. Here we describe an ex vivo
[...] Read more.
There are dozens of approved, investigational and experimental antiviral agents. Many of these agents cause serious side effects, which can only be revealed after drug administration. Identification of the side effects prior to drug administration is challenging. Here we describe an ex vivo approach for studying immuno- and neuro-modulatory properties of antiviral agents, which may be associated with potential side effects of these therapeutics. The current approach combines drug toxicity/efficacy tests and transcriptomics, which is followed by mRNA, cytokine and metabolite profiling. We demonstrated the utility of this approach with several examples of antiviral agents. We also showed that the approach can utilize different immune stimuli and cell types. It can also include other omics techniques, such as genomics and epigenomics, to allow identification of individual markers associated with adverse reactions to antivirals with immuno- and neuro-modulatory properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Viruses and Cellular Metabolism)
Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: A system biology approach for evaluating immuno- and neuro-modulatory activities of antiviral agents
Authors: Eva Zusinaite 1, Aleksandr Ianevski 2, Denis Kainov 1,2
Affiliations: 1 Institute of Technology, University of Tartu, Tartu 50090, Estonia
2 Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim 7028, Norway
Abstract: Several drugs are available and many more are under development for treatment of viral diseases. However, many of these agents possess side effects. Developing an approach for identifying drug side effects in vitro/ex vivo is the greatest challenge. Here we describe a technique, which combines drug toxicity/ efficacy test, transcriptomics and metabolomics, and allows routine evaluation of immuno- and neuro-modulatory effects of antiviral agents in vitro/ex vivo. We used this technique and human cells infected with Zika virus, influenza A virus, or treated with double-stranded RNA, bacterial lipopolysaccharides, or interferon-alpha to show that antiviral saliphenylhalamide, SNS-032, obatoclax and gemcitabine at non-cytotoxic concentrations deferentially affect transcription, translation and metabolism of cellular factors, which are associated with cell-mediated and humoral protection as well as with pain sensitivity in infected patients.

Title: Role of host cell secretory machinery in Zika virus life cycle
Authors: George Belov, Elizabeth Sztul
Abstract: The high human cost of Zika virus infections and the rapid establishment of virus circulation in novel areas, including the United States, present an urgent need for countermeasures against this emerging threat. The development of an effective vaccine against Zika virus may be problematic, because of the cross reactivity of the antibodies with other flaviviruses leading to antibody-dependent enhancement of infection. Moreover, rapidly replicating positive strand RNA viruses, including Zika virus, generate large spectrum of mutant genomes (quasispecies) with every replication round, allowing rapid selection of variants resistant to drugs targeting virus-specific proteins. On the other hand, viruses as ultimate cellular parasites rely on host metabolism for every step of their life cycle, thus presenting an opportunity to manipulate host processes as an alternative approach to suppress virus replication and spread. Zika and other flaviviruses intrinsically depend on the cellular secretory pathway, which transfers proteins and membranes from the ER through the Golgi to the plasma membrane, for virion assembly, maturation and release. In this review we summarize the current knowledge of interaction of Zika and similar arthropod-borne flaviviruses with the cellular secretory machinery with a special emphasis on virus-specific changes of the secretory pathway. Identification of the regulatory networks and effector proteins required to accommodate the virion trafficking, which represents a highly unusual cargo load for the secretory pathway, may open a very attractive and virtually untapped reservoir of alternative targets for the development of superior anti-viral drugs. 

 

 

 

 

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