Annual Meeting of the Rocky Mountain Virology Association

A special issue of Viruses (ISSN 1999-4915). This special issue belongs to the section "General Virology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2024) | Viewed by 4806

Special Issue Editors


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Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA
Interests: flavivirus; dengue virus; zika virus; cyclin dependent kinase 8; walleye dermal sarcoma virus
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Guest Editor
Arthropod-Borne & Infectious Diseases Laboratory, Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA
Interests: arboviral replication; cellular metabolism
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Clinical Microbiology, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Children’s Hospital Colorado, Aurora CO,
Interests: clinical microbiology; pediatric infectious disease diagnostics; parechoviruses; enteroviruses; EV-D68, EV-A71; viral co-infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

For the 22nd annual meeting of the Rocky Mountain Virology Association, we will publish the proceedings of the meeting in a special issue in the journal, Viruses. In addition, the special issue welcomes full-length research and review manuscript submissions from all attendees.

Dr. Joel Rovnak
Dr. Rushika Perera
Dr. Molly Butler
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Viruses is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • viruses
  • prions
  • animal models
  • virus-host interactions
  • pathogenesis
  • infection
  • disease
  • novel technologies

Published Papers (3 papers)

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15 pages, 2908 KiB  
Article
Galbut Virus Infection Minimally Influences Drosophila melanogaster Fitness Traits in a Strain and Sex-Dependent Manner
by Shaun T. Cross, Ali L. Brehm, Tillie J. Dunham, Case P. Rodgers, Alexandra H. Keene, Grace I. Borlee and Mark D. Stenglein
Viruses 2023, 15(2), 539; https://doi.org/10.3390/v15020539 - 15 Feb 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1818
Abstract
Galbut virus (family Partitiviridae) infects Drosophila melanogaster and can be transmitted vertically from infected mothers or infected fathers with near perfect efficiency. This form of super-Mendelian inheritance should drive infection to 100% prevalence, and indeed, galbut virus is ubiquitous in wild D. [...] Read more.
Galbut virus (family Partitiviridae) infects Drosophila melanogaster and can be transmitted vertically from infected mothers or infected fathers with near perfect efficiency. This form of super-Mendelian inheritance should drive infection to 100% prevalence, and indeed, galbut virus is ubiquitous in wild D. melanogaster populations. However, on average, only about 60% of individual flies are infected. One possible explanation for this is that a subset of flies are resistant to infection. Although galbut virus-infected flies appear healthy, infection may be sufficiently costly to drive selection for resistant hosts, thereby decreasing overall prevalence. To test this hypothesis, we quantified a variety of fitness-related traits in galbut virus-infected flies from two lines from the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP). Galbut virus-infected flies had no difference in average lifespan and total offspring production compared to their uninfected counterparts. Galbut virus-infected DGRP-517 flies pupated and eclosed faster than their uninfected counterparts. Some galbut virus-infected flies exhibited altered sensitivity to viral, bacterial, and fungal pathogens. The microbiome composition of flies was not measurably perturbed by galbut virus infection. Differences in phenotype attributable to galbut virus infection varied as a function of fly sex and DGRP strain, and differences attributable to infection status were dwarfed by larger differences attributable to strain and sex. Thus, galbut virus infection does produce measurable phenotypic changes, with changes being minor, offsetting, and possibly net-negative. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Annual Meeting of the Rocky Mountain Virology Association)
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22 pages, 1983 KiB  
Conference Report
The 23rd Annual Meeting of the Rocky Mountain Virology Association
by Ali L. Brehm, Tillie J. Dunham, Samantha M. Pinto, Kaitlynn A. Williams, Kathryn L. Coffin, Molly E. Ring, Oshani C. Ratnayake, Joel Rovnak and Rushika Perera
Viruses 2024, 16(4), 586; https://doi.org/10.3390/v16040586 - 10 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Located 50 miles west of Fort Collins, Colorado, Colorado State University’s Mountain Campus in Pingree Park hosted the 23rd annual Rocky Mountain Virology Association meeting in 2023 with 116 participants. The 3-day event at the end of September consisted of 28 talks and [...] Read more.
Located 50 miles west of Fort Collins, Colorado, Colorado State University’s Mountain Campus in Pingree Park hosted the 23rd annual Rocky Mountain Virology Association meeting in 2023 with 116 participants. The 3-day event at the end of September consisted of 28 talks and 43 posters that covered the topics of viral evolution and surveillance, developments in prion research, arboviruses and vector biology, host–virus interactions, and viral immunity and vaccines. This year’s Randall Jay Cohrs keynote presentation covered the topic of One Health and emerging coronaviruses. This timely discussion covered the importance of global disease surveillance, international collaboration, and trans-disciplinary research teams to prevent and control future pandemics. Peak fall colors flanked the campus and glowed along the multiple mountain peaks, allowing for pristine views while discussing science and networking, or engaging in mountain activities like fly fishing and hiking. On behalf of the Rocky Mountain Virology Association, this report summarizes select presentations from the 23rd annual meeting. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Annual Meeting of the Rocky Mountain Virology Association)
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29 pages, 6049 KiB  
Conference Report
The 22nd Annual Meeting of the Rocky Mountain Virology Association
by Oshani C. Ratnayake, Paul Gendler, Benjamin Swartzwelter, Alexandra Keene, Ali L. Brehm, Sandra L. Quackenbush, Joel Rovnak and Rushika Perera
Viruses 2023, 15(1), 98; https://doi.org/10.3390/v15010098 - 29 Dec 2022
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Abstract
Following the cause established twenty-two years ago, the 22nd Annual Rocky Mountain Virology Association meeting was held amidst the resplendent Rocky Mountains within the Arapahoe and Roosevelt National Forests. 116 intellectuals including both regional and international scientists as well as trainees gathered at [...] Read more.
Following the cause established twenty-two years ago, the 22nd Annual Rocky Mountain Virology Association meeting was held amidst the resplendent Rocky Mountains within the Arapahoe and Roosevelt National Forests. 116 intellectuals including both regional and international scientists as well as trainees gathered at the Colorado State University Mountain Campus for this three-day forum. Current trends in virology and prion disease research were discussed both in talks and poster presentations. This year’s keynote address emphasized innate immune modulation by arboviruses while other invited speakers shared updates on noroviruses, retroviruses, coronaviruses and prion diversity. Additionally, the need for and importance of better approaches for sharing science with non-science communities via science communication was discussed. Trainees and junior investigators presented 19 talks and 31 posters. This report encapsulates selected studies presented at the 22nd Rocky Mountain National Virology Association meeting held on 30 September–2 October 2022. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Annual Meeting of the Rocky Mountain Virology Association)
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